Paul Allen says book not revenge against Gates

Apr 15, 2011

(AP) -- Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen defends his new book in an upcoming episode of "60 Minutes." He says it was meant as an important slice of technology history and not as revenge against Bill Gates.

Allen, who left in 1983, tells Lesley Stahl of "60 Minutes" that he wanted to tell that history the way it happened. In video excerpt CBS posted on its website, Allen says he hopes people understand this.

But for all the harsh pictures he paints of Gates, Allen reveals another side, too. Gates, who now focuses on philanthropy, comforted Allen when he got cancer a second time in 2009. Says Allen: "there's a bond there that can't be denied."

Allen's book, "Idea Man," hits shelves Tuesday. The "60 Minutes" episode airs Sunday.

Explore further: Weibo IPO below expectations, raises $285.6 mn

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Famed physicist James Van Allen dead at 91

Aug 09, 2006

Renowned physicist James Van Allen, who helped launch the United States into the space age and for whom the Van Allen radiation belts are named, has died. He was 91.

Recommended for you

Weibo IPO below expectations, raises $285.6 mn

10 hours ago

Sina Weibo sold fewer shares than expected in its US IPO which was priced below expectations ahead of a Thursday listing that takes place after tech selloffs on Wall Street.

'Chief Yahoo' David Filo returns to board

11 hours ago

Yahoo announced the nomination of three new board members, including company co-founder David Filo, who earned the nickname and formal job title of "Chief Yahoo."

Fired Yahoo exec gets $58M for 15 months of work

11 hours ago

Yahoo's recently fired chief operating officer, Henrique de Castro, left the Internet company with a severance package of $58 million even though he lasted just 15 months on the job.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump (Update)

21 hours ago

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exacerbated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear energy

Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy industry under intense scrutiny since the Fukushima disaster, the ...

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...