Panasonic releases re-writeable triple-layer 100GB Blu-ray disk

Apr 04, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

Blu-ray is an interesting format. It holds a lot more data than a traditional CD or DVD, and it allows for high definition viewing experiences. As it turns out however, the average consumer probably does not care that much about that level of high definition. Sure, some segments of the market, like the film industry, movie buffs and gamers, have latched on quickly, but it seems for the average consumer the Blu-ray disc drives just are not worth the extra costs that they add onto the machines, which may explain why they have yet to become standard on most machines. That has not stopped manufacturers from taking bets that eventually Blu-ray will be the future of the disk-based data storage world.

Panasonic is making one of its bets on Blu-ray in the re-writeable end of the market. They have announced the release of re-writable Blu-ray discs, which will allow consumers to put data on the disk multiple times, much like with the more common CD- or DVD-RW. The disks, which have been dubbed the LM-BE100J BDXL, are a special series. These single-sided triple-layer disks, which have a scratch resistant coating on them to help keep them from being destroyed by daily wear and tear, will be able to hold up to 100GB of data at a time.

Before you get excited, you will need to make sure that you burner is compatible with the Blu-ray-RW's, since not all burners are ready to use these disks. We do know that the newest burners made by both Pioneer and Buffalo are compatible with these disks. If you think you can skip the check, and just shove it in the drawer if it doesn't work, you are making a serious gamble. Each of these disks will set you back about $120.

The disks are expected to be on sale, in Japan, on April 15th.

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More information: In Japanese: panasonic.co.jp/corp/news/offi… 04-1/jn110404-1.html

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User comments : 14

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Quantum_Conundrum
5 / 5 (10) Apr 04, 2011
Pointless.

You can buy a larger HD, or an external drive, and just uninstall it and pack it around for that price.

You can buy a 2TB external hard drive for just $75 which uses USB 2.0...which means it's instantly compatible with any computer at home or work...

Why in the hell would you pay $120 for a blue ray disk that only holds 100GB, not counting the price of the burner?
epsi00
5 / 5 (3) Apr 04, 2011
For once, I agree with you.
KaiBrunnenG
5 / 5 (2) Apr 04, 2011
I came to the same conclusion a long time ago Quantum. I used to back up all my data on cd/dvds. It was tedious time-consuming and aggravating work. Not only can you lose data from bad discs, but accessing them again is very slow.

So likewise for me, hd's became the only sensible solution and since they're cheap (per gb), you can store terabytes of info, there's just no comparison.

I think the optical disc industry will eventually die and maybe only the movie studios will use them. Everyone else will be downloading and saving to hd's and ssd's when they get cheap enough. Blu-ray and the others can kma.

The only way they can even hope to survive is to offer TB size discs which are fairly inexpensive and have very high access speeds. Why would consumers opt for slower, more cumbersome technology when there is a better solution?
Quantum_Conundrum
5 / 5 (2) Apr 04, 2011
yeah, even if you need more, it's always cheaper to buy more external HDs...

Then just label the HDs by what you have put in them...

Even if you're too lazy to unplug them or remember which is which, one USB controller can support, with USB hubs, up to 256 USB devices simultaneously, and new motherboards come with, I think, 11 USB 2.0 controllers and ports now?! That's up to 2800 USB devices simultaneously! Complete overkill, I know, but just making the point. You could run your own data center off a PC and some USB hubs...

I don't even do data storage honestly, most of my HD is empty... Anyway, realistically, you'd just buy an extra external drive every time you need one, and label them and store them in a rack if you aren't using them...

The only main issue down the road may be backwards compatibility if the USB families of ports eventually become obsolete, but I'm sure someone is going to always make a converter to previous ports technologies.
dirk_bruere
5 / 5 (6) Apr 04, 2011
100GB of USB3 flash will soon be pretty cheap.
I don't want more spinning crap in my computer
Parsec
5 / 5 (1) Apr 04, 2011
yeah, even if you need more, it's always cheaper to buy more external HDs...

Then just label the HDs by what you have put in them...

............
I don't even do data storage honestly, most of my HD is empty... Anyway, realistically, you'd just buy an extra external drive every time you need one, and label them and store them in a rack if you aren't using them...

The only main issue down the road may be backwards compatibility if the USB families of ports eventually become obsolete, but I'm sure someone is going to always make a converter to previous ports technologies.

Now I know where to send all those boxes of old cards, paper-tape, and 9-track reel-to-reel tapes I have been hanging on to...
Nemo
5 / 5 (1) Apr 05, 2011
$120 a disk hmm? I have wonder if the manufacturing cost for a disk is a lot less than a dollar.
frajo
5 / 5 (3) Apr 05, 2011
Blu-ray technology is not without serious drawbacks. Wikipedia:
The Blu-ray Disc format employs several layers of digital rights management (DRM). This has led to extensive criticism of the format by organisations opposed to DRM, such as the Free Software Foundation.
Anybody going to use Blu-ray devices should have read the section "Controversy" in Wikipedia's entry "Digital rights management" in order not to suffer bad experiences.
Ricochet
5 / 5 (2) Apr 05, 2011
The only drawback I can see with using HDs for offline storage is the fact that the magnetic storage mediums do lose their viability after a while... granted, it's a long while, but not as long as the physical decay of the blu-ray disc medium, from what I understand.
Eikka
4.7 / 5 (3) Apr 05, 2011
The only drawback I can see with using HDs for offline storage is the fact that the magnetic storage mediums do lose their viability after a while... granted, it's a long while, but not as long as the physical decay of the blu-ray disc medium, from what I understand.


Except for the fact that (re)writable discs use sensitive dyes that bleach over time. The faster the dye (higher writing speeds) the faster it degrades.

Current high density magnetic media hasn't been around for long enough to know if it's any better, though. The main problem being that the electronics board gives up the ghost due to some sort of planned obsolescence, like losing its programming because the firmware is on a bit of flash memory that leaks its gate charge in about a decade.

In that sense, passive media like DVDs are better, because a new device to read them can be always bought or built, whereas trying to resurrect an old hard drive is much more difficult.
Norezar
not rated yet Apr 08, 2011
They're idiots for trying to push optical media these days.
6_6
not rated yet Apr 09, 2011
dollar for dollar, you can't beat HDD's. The disc would have to cost less than $3 to make it considerable for regular users
Bob_Kob
not rated yet Apr 10, 2011
My computer hasn't had a dvd drive for 3 years now. I've absolutely no reason to use optical media. Internet + usb drives solve all my storage issues.
kaasinees
1 / 5 (1) Apr 10, 2011
QC is an idiot.

He does not understand the appliance of different media.

For example, companies still use tape drives to make backups.