NWS: NE Mississippi tornado was highest-rated EF-5

Apr 30, 2011 By KRISTI EATON , Associated Press
Jessica Monaghan wipes a tear away as she surveys the damage in Smithville, Miss., while her nine-month old son Glade Scott sleeps, Thursday, April 28, 2011, following a tornado touchdown Wednesday afternoon that destroyed much of the small community. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

(AP) -- At least one of the massive tornadoes that killed hundreds across the South this week was a devastating EF-5 storm, according to an analysis Friday by the National Weather Service, which suspects several others also were the worst of the worst.

After the first day of assessing storm damage, the weather service said the tornado that hit Smithville, Miss., at 3:44 p.m. EDT on Wednesday was an EF-5 storm. That's the highest rating given to assess a tornado's wind speed, and is based in part on damage caused by the storm.

The weather service said the half-mile wide Smithville tornado had peak winds of 205 mph and was on the ground for close to three miles, killing 14 and injuring 40.

It was the first EF-5 tornado to strike Mississippi since 1966, and the first EF-5 tornado in the United States since a May 25, 2008, storm in Parkersburg, Iowa.

Meteorologist Jim LaDue at the weather service's Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., said he expects "many more" of the that killed at least 297 people during Wednesday's brutal outbreak of will be rated EF-5.

The weather service also is sending assessment teams back out to review more damage in several states, including Mississippi and Alabama. The assessments are preliminary, and are based on photos taken during the ground surveys and consultation with experts. They will be confirmed later this year.

Meteorologist Mary Keiser at the weather service's Birmingham office said the tornado that tore across Bibb, Greene and Hale counties in northern Alabama was given a preliminary EF-3 rating, which has winds of 136 to 165 mph. At least seven people were killed and 50 were injured.

"The tornado track was 71.3 miles long and the largest width - the tornado at its widest point - was one mile wide," Keiser said. "Its peak winds were 145 mph at the start and end times."

According to surveys, the tornado was an EF-1 when it touched down in southwest Greene County near the Tombigbee River just west of Tishabee. It intensified into an EF-2 as it moved north of Forkland and across the Black Warrior River into Sawyerville and the Talladega National Forest in Hale County, where six fatalities and 40 injuries occurred.

It became an EF-3 northeast of Sawyerville and continued to track into Bibb County, where one person was killed and eight were hurt, according to the weather service.

Surveys on the twisters that hit Hackelburg, Shottsville and Haileyville in Alabama were said to be of EF-3 strength or potentially higher. The surveys are being further evaluated, the weather service said.

Keiser said it will take time for meteorologists to complete damage assessment.

"This is very rare, historic damage so we want to make sure it's accurate," she said.

The Smithville tornado rated EF-5 destroyed 18 homes, which the weather service said were well built, less than 10 years old and bolted to their foundation.

The plumbing systems and appliances in the worst part of the storm's damage path were either shredded or missing entirely, as is a 1965 Chevrolet pickup truck that was parked in front of one of the destroyed homes.

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Quantum_Conundrum
2.1 / 5 (7) Apr 30, 2011
Can't blame global warming or "climate change".

According to HAMWeather.com, no record temperatures or precipitation events occurred in the entire nation in the past 7 days.

No record high maximum
No record high minimum
No record low minimum
No record low maximum
No record rain
No record snow

Climatalogically, it was a perfectly "Average" last week of April in every respect except for number of tornados.
FrankHerbert
0.8 / 5 (50) Apr 30, 2011
Lol nothing out of the ordinary, OTHER THAN THE STORMS THEMSELVES. Lol, seriously?
210
3.7 / 5 (3) Apr 30, 2011
Can't blame global warming or "climate change".

According to HAMWeather.com, no record temperatures or precipitation events occurred in the entire nation in the past 7 days.

No record high maximum
No record high minimum
No record low minimum
No record low maximum
No record rain
No record snow

Climatalogically, it was a perfectly "Average" last week of April in every respect except for number of tornados.

These 'facts' you list, they are NEVER mandatory whenever tornadoes spawn. That is, you do NOT need these conditions in order for Tornadoes to spawn.
The marvel is the strength and earliness of such activity.
As for Global Temperature change, the alleged changes associated with global warming are so subtle to the human senses and are supposed to occur over a broad swath of time. Our world has seen climate change before, we may be enduring it now, but, these storms may be affected by the fading El Nina rather than some other factor.
-word-to-ya-muthas-
Quantum_Conundrum
3 / 5 (2) Apr 30, 2011
Lol nothing out of the ordinary, OTHER THAN THE STORMS THEMSELVES. Lol, seriously?


The point is this extreme weather event does not at all correlate to any markers of global warming or "climate change," including the primary marker, which is temperature extremes.
Quantum_Conundrum
2.3 / 5 (3) Apr 30, 2011
210:

I didn't say any of those were in any way mandatory, as they definitely are not.

What I was pointing out is that there was no relationship between the tornados and "climate change" markers.

There have been 4 or 5 other similar tornado outbreaks in U.S. history, including one worse than this, and it so happens the worst one happened the longest time in the past, back in the 1920's.

This extreme weather event happened during a week which had absolutely zero temperature or precipitation extremes for the entire week.

Therefore, as I said, this extreme weather event does not relate to, and is not caused by any alleged "climate change".
Greenlogic
3 / 5 (2) Apr 30, 2011
210:

I didn't say any of those were in any way mandatory, as they definitely are not.
-snip
Therefore, as I said, this extreme weather event does not relate to, and is not caused by any alleged "climate change".

The most basic implication of climate change is that an overall average increase in temperature increase the amount of heat energy in the atmosphere and oceans. Heat convection systems covering millions of square miles are what primarily powers weather phenomena.

Or in other words, large scale and severe weather events become more common as overall temperatures increase. They are not caused by climate change directly, but it factors in much the same way increased speed increases the severity of a collision; didn't cause, just made worse.
Vendicar_Decarian
0.2 / 5 (37) Apr 30, 2011
"The point is this extreme weather event does not at all correlate to any markers of global warming or "climate change,"" - QCTard

Correlation my little Tard... is a statistical concept. A single event - like this outbreak of tornado's - can therfore correlate with nothing.

However over time we see an increase in the number of severe weather events. And that increase in rate, does indeed correlate with the increase in global average surface temperature.

You poor baby you.

Vendicar_Decarian
0.3 / 5 (38) Apr 30, 2011
"What I was pointing out is that there was no relationship between the tornados and "climate change" markers." - QCTard

Which is not born out by observation.

Direct observation shows that the rate of formation of tornado's has increased as global average temperature has increased. Hence there is a correlation.

However that correlated increase in tornado count is hampered by a poorer ability to count tornado's the farther you go back in time.

So while there is a correlation it can't be said to be a statistically significant correlation.

In short, you are childishly confusing a lack of statistically significant correlation resulting from observation bias, with a lack of causation.

This is the Quack-Tard flipside to the use of correlation to "prove" causation.

Both are equally Tard.
Vendicar_Decarian
0.2 / 5 (38) Apr 30, 2011
"According to HAMWeather.com, no record temperatures or precipitation events occurred in the entire nation in the past 7 days." - Fluffy-Tard

Illustrating that Tornado's don't need such extreme weather conditions to form.

Your point is?????????
omatumr
1 / 5 (3) May 01, 2011
Has any federal agency considered that fact that:

1. The Earth and our stormy Sun are intimately connected. These objects are mistakenly perceived as separate entities, in large part because visible light from the photosphere produces the illusion of a solar surface between the Earth and the Sun.

2. The outer layer of the Sun actually encompasses Earth and all of the other planets.

3. The Sun is not the mild mannered, hydrogen fusion reactor described by the Standard Solar Model (SSM), but the unstable remains of a supernova that gave birth to the solar system before reforming on the remnant pulsar.

"Super-fluidity in the solar interior: Implications for solar eruptions and climate"
Journal of Fusion Energy 21, 193-198 (2002).
http://arxiv.org/.../0501441

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Vendicar_Decarian
0.5 / 5 (39) May 01, 2011
"The Earth and our stormy Sun are intimately connected." - Tard of Tards

You are absolutely right It was sunspot 1203 that cased those tornado's over Arkansas last week.

Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (1) May 01, 2011
"According to HAMWeather.com, no record temperatures or precipitation events occurred in the entire nation in the past 7 days." - Fluffy-Tard

Illustrating that Tornado's don't need such extreme weather conditions to form.

Your point is?????????


At this moment, my point is you are obviously too stupid to understand my point.

For the second time, I NEVER SAID TORNADOS NEEDED SUCH CONDITIONS, so quit arguing against something I never said.

The number of tornados has not gone up verifiably, because of our detection technology and population density.

Now we count seperate tornados and vortices, which in the past would have been counted as a single event. We also detect "F/EF0" and "F/EF1" storms which in the past might not have been noticed as such at all.

Direct observation shows that the rate of formation of tornado's has increased as global average temperature has increased.


False. Direct observation has shown no such thing...continued.
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (1) May 01, 2011
If the alleged global warming was causing more tornados, or increasing their intensity, we should have noticed it continuously since the 1980's, but we haven't. It took 37 years for the "Super outbreak" record to be broken, even with our increasing population to observe more often, increasing technology to observe more accurately, and the alleged increasing CO2 and temperatures to allegedly make the outbreaks stronger,e tc.

If temperatures were increasing, and if there were any relationship to tornado strength and number, the 1974 outbreak record should have been broken several times by now, every few years in fact.

Why no record breaking "super outbreak" 18 years ago, when half the alleged warming since 1974 would have occured? Why no record-breaking super outbreak in the 80's? 90's? 00's?

Because there is no relationship to any alleged warming.
omatumr
1 / 5 (3) May 01, 2011
Climatology: Latest Fad of the Flat Earth Society, . .


. . . describes the army of Nobel Prize winning climatologists that Al Gore and the UN's IPCC tricked into thinking Earth's climate and long-range weather are independent of the stormy Sun that engulfs planet Earth and sustains our very lives.

See: "Earth's Heat Source - The Sun", Energy and Environment 20, 131-144 (2009);
http://arxiv.org/pdf/0905.0704

Political leaders would like us to think that they have the power to control Earth's climate, but they and their followers understand science no better than members of the Flat Earth Society.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
MrPressure
May 02, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.