Nuclear still main alternative to oil: ex-IAEA chief

Apr 17, 2011
Egyptian opposition leader and Nobel peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei addresses the opening session of the Dubai Global Energy Forum in the Gulf emirate. The former head of UN atomic agency voiced confidence Sunday in nuclear energy as the only real alternative to oil despite a potential "setback" in the sector due to Japan's current disaster.

The former head of UN atomic agency voiced confidence Sunday in nuclear energy as the only real alternative to oil despite a potential "setback" in the sector due to Japan's current disaster.

"Today, nuclear power is the only real alternative to fossil fuel as a source of a reliable supply," said Egyptian Mohamed ElBaradei, speaking at the opening of the Dubai Global Energy Forum.

ElBaradei, who stepped down as the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency in November, acknowledged that confidence in atomic energy has taken a severe blow after the tsunami-triggered disaster at Fukushima Daiichi .

"Fukushima represents a potentially significant setback for nuclear power," he told participants in the forum, stressing, however, that confidence will be "reestablished in due course".

The six-reactor nuclear power plant at Fukushima Daiichi, located 250 kilometres (155 miles) northeast of Tokyo, was hit by a 14-metre (46-foot) tsunami on March 11, triggering the world's worst nuclear accident since in 1986.

"Chernobyl and Fukushima should be shown to be aberrations," he said.

ElBaradei is now a prominent pro-democracy figure in Egypt, and is a potential presidential candidate after protests forced former president Hosni Mubarak to step down after ruling the country for three decades.

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User comments : 5

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knikiy
1 / 5 (3) Apr 17, 2011
I thought denial was a river in Egypt.
LuckyExplorer
not rated yet Apr 18, 2011
What else should the ex head or head of UN atomic agency say?
Very exciting...
OdieNewton
4 / 5 (4) Apr 18, 2011
Well he's right. Despite the two major meltdowns (excluding Three Mile Island... nobody was hurt...) we've had in the past 40 years, nuclear energy still far surpasses any other alternatives. Just because we get into car accidents doesn't mean we should go on a mass protest banning automobiles.
Shootist
3.8 / 5 (5) Apr 18, 2011
"Nuclear still main alternative to oil: ex-IAEA chief"

uh, duh?

If the US built 100 1GW fission plants, North America could tell the mideast to drink its oil.

Brittle power, such as wind and sun, will never replace, and can only supplement, more robust energy solutions.
DoubleD
4 / 5 (4) Apr 18, 2011
Shootist - Currently there are 104 US reactors averaging around 1000MWe apiece and they supply 20% of our electricity. Meaning we would have to build another 400 or so of those to displace our (mainly) coal and gas-generating power plants. Very little electricity is generated from oil. A whole lot more than 100 would be needed to generate enough electricity to tell the mideast to drink their oil. I am not complaining because I work for a major nuclear vendor. Lets get building!

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