Koreas to hold 2nd round of rare volcano talks

Apr 07, 2011

(AP) -- South Korea's Unification Ministry says experts from the two Koreas will meet again for rare talks about research into an active volcano touted in the North as leader Kim Jong Il's birthplace.

The countries' geologists and volcanologists met last week and agreed on the need for joint research into the North's Mount Paektu, though they didn't map out details.

The talks came amid worries over natural disasters after Japan's and tsunami last month.

Seoul's Unification Ministry says North Korea agreed Thursday to hold the second round of talks next Tuesday at the North Korean border town of Kaesong.

The talks may be an attempt by the North to improve strained ties between the divided Koreas.

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