Kondo Robot releases a hexapod robot kit (w/ video)

Apr 11, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Kondo Robot, a Japan-based robotics company known for selling robotics kits which often end up in robot-on-robot battles, announced the release of a new robot kit. The kit, named the KMR-M6 is a Hexapod Robot, that is reminiscent of a spider in its appearance. The kit is designed to be fairly stable. In addition to only requiring two servos per leg, for movement, the robot has a unique spring and multi-bar linkage approach that gives it the ability to navigate more complex obstacles.

The KMR-M6 has a low profile, at about 14 inches tall, which makes maneuvering through smaller spaces less laborius, and decreases the robots center of gravity, which decreases the likelihood that it will tip over while navigating those obstacles.

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The brain of the KMR-M6 is a Kondo RCB-4HV. It is powered by a ROBO Power Cell 10.8V 800mAh Ni-MH battery. As for aesthetics, the wiring, controller and all other on-board electronics are hidden from view, in a compartment on the robots back.

In addition to selling this stock hexapod kit, the company will also be selling individual leg assemblies and other parts from the bot kit. This will give robot builders the chance to use these parts to create their own multi-legged robot designs. Kondo Robot currently serves only the Japanese market, so robot builders from other nations will have to find a different supplier for hexapod robot parts. The KMR-M6 Hexapod Robot is expected to begin shipping in May of 2011, and will cost roughly 76,000 yen, or $880 US dollars.

Explore further: SRI microrobots show fast-building factory approach (w/ video)

More information: via Robot Dreams

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rgwalther
not rated yet Apr 11, 2011
Don't want to meet this in a dark alley.
CHollman82
2.3 / 5 (3) Apr 11, 2011
High degree of want

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