Earth from space: Central Europe

Apr 01, 2011
This Envisat image, acquired on 22 March 2011, features an almost cloud-free look at a large portion of Europe. The Alps, with its white peaks, stand out in contrast against the vast areas still covered in brownish winter foliage. Several dark blue European lakes also stand out. The crescent-shaped Lake Geneva (north of Alps) is Europe’s largest Alpine lake. Its northern part is located in Switzerland, and its southern part in France. With a surface of 218 sq km, Lake Neuchâtel (above Lake Geneva) is the largest lake located entirely in Switzerland. Lake Constance (northeast of Lake Neuchâtel) straddles the borders of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Italy’s largest and Central Europe’s third largest lake, Garda, sits at the foot of the Alps. Credit: ESA

(PhysOrg.com) -- This Envisat image features an almost cloud-free look at a large portion of Europe. The Alps, with its white peaks, stand out in contrast against the vast areas still covered in brownish winter foliage.

Occupying an area of about 200 000 sq km, south central Europe’s great mountain system extends some 1200 km from the coastline of southern France (bottom left) into Switzerland (east of France), Italy (bottom right) and Austria (east of Switzerland).

It then runs down through Slovenia (south of Austria), Croatia (bottom right side), Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro before ending in Albania.

Several dark blue European lakes also stand out. The crescent-shaped Lake Geneva (north of ) is Europe’s largest Alpine lake. Its northern part is located in Switzerland, and its southern part in France.

With a surface of 218 sq km, Lake Neuchâtel (above Lake Geneva) is the largest lake located entirely in Switzerland. Lake Constance (northeast of Lake Neuchâtel) straddles the borders of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Italy’s largest and Central Europe’s third largest , Garda, sits at the foot of the Alps.

This image was acquired by Envisat’s Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer on 22 March at a resolution of 300 m.

Explore further: Evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet

Related Stories

Earth from Space: A smoke-free Iceland

Jun 04, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- This Envisat image features a smoke-free Iceland. Although the island has received a lot of attention in the past months for its volcanic activity, it is also home to numerous glaciers, lakes, ...

Just how low can Mars go?

Oct 08, 2010

There are few places on Mars lower than this. On the left of this image, the floor of Melas Chasma sinks nine kilometres below the surrounding plains. New images from ESA’s Mars Express highlight the ...

Recommended for you

Evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet

11 minutes ago

ULB study sheds a new light on the stability of the Antarctic ice sheet. It shows for the first time that ice rises (pinning points that keep the floating parts of ice sheets in place) are formed during the transition between ...

Severe ozone depletion avoided

19 hours ago

We are already reaping the rewards of the Montreal Protocol, with the ozone layer in much better shape than it would have been without the UN treaty, according to a new study in Nature Communications.

Location matters in the lowland Amazon

May 25, 2015

You know the old saying: Location, location, location? It turns out that it applies to the Amazon rainforest, too. New work from Carnegie's Greg Asner illustrates a hidden tapestry of chemical variation across ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.