Drink-Making Unit 2.0: A.K.A. how science helps get you drunk

Apr 05, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- When a company names itself Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories, you have to appreciate their sense of whimsy and humor. When they build you machines that make you a drink and entertain you at the same time, well then all you can do is raise a glass to their health.

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories has released its Drink-Making Unit 2.0, which as you may have guessed is the second model in the Drink-Making Unit series of machines. The Drink-Making Unit 2.0 however represents a serious change to the design.

The Drink-Making Unit 2.0 is based on what is known as a “deer chaser” model, and those of you who are from, or have traveled in Japan, may know that this system is a bit involved. The system consists of a set of cylinders that will keep filling until they reach a tip point. These containers, which in this case are a set of graduates cylinders, are then poured out of the container and into a funnel. Once the funnel has all of the liquids that it needs to make the drink, the funnel seals and the liquids are dropped out into the glass waiting below.

The mixing in this mixology is created by the dropping of fluids into the funnel and the final drop into the glass. So, don't expect to get a stirred martini out of this machine, which despite James Bond's preference, is the traditional way to prepare one.

The odds are that you won't see these machines supplanting your local bartender just yet. At least not unless you go to some pretty interesting watering holes. No pricing information has been released at this time.

Explore further: US agency threatens to act against air bag maker

More information: www.evilmadscientist.com/article.php/barbot2011

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