Watch how curiosity will land on Mars

Apr 06, 2011 By Nancy Atkinson

Entry, descent and landing is the big moment for any Mars lander mission, and the big honkin’ Mars Science Lab and its sky-crane landing system will truly be unique. This brand new video from the Jet Propulsion Lab shows how MSL, a.k.a Curiosoity will land on the Red Planet in August of 2012. Doug Ellison, part of the team who worked on this computer generated video told Universe Today that the scenes from Mars shown here were created from real elevation data from the HiRISE camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and the outcrop of rock that Curiosity visits is based on Burns Cliff, visited by Opportunity in 2004.

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When they started working on the video, the real wasn’t as close to completion as it is now. “The oddity is that we had to finish our virtual rover ahead of the real rover!” Ellison said. “The rover and other major components were derived from simplified CAD drawings, combined with lots of photographs of the actual hardware under construction.”

I asked Ellison how he and his colleagues create the scenes of events that haven’t happened yet.

“We were not starting from scratch, as we collaborated with the same team responsible for the earlier MSL animation you may have seen, (created about two years ago)” Ellison said. “People from different elements of the project helped steer us on how their elements of the project work. We then worked through a review process with those teams to make sure we get both how it looks, and how it works, as accurate as we can, whilst still being engaging.”

“The EDL team especially were a thrill to work with,” Ellison continued, “urging us to reflect the dynamic, violent nature of landing on another planet. They commented that once it’s on that Atlas V and on its way to , they never get to see it at work. This animation is the thing they can show to friends and family to say ‘This is what I do’.”

Ellison said his team is working on a longer and more complete movie that should be finished with the next few months.

But for now, enjoy this thrill-ride along with Curiosity!

Explore further: Space sex geckos at risk as Russia loses control of satellite

More information: For more information about MSL’s landing, here’s a link to a detailed PDF all about EDL

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zbarlici
not rated yet Apr 06, 2011
thats awesome!
soulman
3 / 5 (4) Apr 07, 2011
Yes, a fantastic simulation. Looking at it like that drives home the complexity of just getting to the surface.

There's so many different stages, with one container releasing another, shields being jettisoned, parachute opening, lander being deployed then releasing the rover, before flying off. If something went wrong at any one stage, the whole thing would be an expensive piece of junk. It's a wonder so many landers actually make it! Hope this one does.
ubavontuba
1 / 5 (1) Apr 07, 2011
I loved the sound effects! LOL! I guess it really would have been boring without them...
Cynical1
not rated yet Apr 07, 2011
Johnny Five takes a holiday....
ACW
5 / 5 (1) Apr 08, 2011
So much for keeping things simple. I hope they pull it all off. Very cool video.