Wisconsin boaters, anglers doing more to halt spread of invasives

Mar 02, 2011

Wisconsin boaters and anglers seem to be doing a better job of following rules aimed at curbing the spread of aquatic invasive species, according to the results of UW-Madison surveys taken in 2009 and 2010.

Researchers found that 87 percent of boaters and anglers surveyed in 2010 said they removed plants from their boat before leaving the landing, compared to 76 percent in 2009. Removing plants can help prevent the spread of aquatic such as Eurasian water milfoil and curly-leaf pondweed to new, uninfected lakes.

The researchers also found more compliance with rules aimed at preventing the spread of diseases such as and other aquatic invasives. In 2010, 90 percent of anglers drained the water from their boats (up from 81 percent in 2009), while 75 percent did not move live fish (up from 69 percent), and 47 percent did not add water to their bait containers (up from 35 percent).

The increased compliance is related both to boaters' increased awareness of how can damage Wisconsin's and to their desire to avoid getting a ticket for breaking the law, according to assistant professor Bret Shaw and associate professor Dominque Brossard of the UW-Madison Department of Life Sciences Communication.

While the results suggest that ongoing efforts to educate boaters and anglers about aquatic invasive species are paying off, there is room for improvement, they add.

"It only takes one boater or angler to spread aquatic invasive species," Brossard points out.

Explore further: EU, others: Catch plans for Bluefin tuna threaten recovery

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Curly-leaf Pondweed found near Bozeman, Montana

Jul 13, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- In late June, curly-leaf pondweed (Potamogeton crispus), one of Montana's Priority 1 noxious weeds, was found near Bozeman in several ponds along the East Gallatin River drainage system. Priority ...

Hope for Ridding Lakes of Clawed Invader

Jul 31, 2006

The rusty crayfish - a voracious, bullying exotic that has visited ecological havoc on numerous Wisconsin lakes - may have finally met its match.

Recommended for you

EU, others: Catch plans for Bluefin tuna threaten recovery

21 hours ago

(AP)—The European Union, Japan and other nations hunting for the eastern Atlantic Bluefin tuna are fearful that Turkey's unilateral decision to exceed catch limits agreed last year is threatening the stock ...

Salish Sea seagull populations halved since 1980s

23 hours ago

The number of seagulls in the Strait of Georgia is down by 50 per cent from the 1980s and University of British Columbia researchers say the decline reflects changes in the availability of food.

Banksias differ on resilience to climate change

Feb 27, 2015

Research into the germination requirements of four Banksia species (Proteaceae) endemic to the South West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) has found certain species may be more vulnerable to climate change ...

China bans ivory carving imports for one year

Feb 27, 2015

Beijing has imposed a one-year ban on the import of ivory carvings, amid international criticism that rapidly-growing Chinese demand could push wild African elephants to extinction within a generation.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.