30 whales stranded on Australian coast

March 17, 2011
Department Of Conservation handout photo shows a pilot whale that died in 2010 in New Zealand. A pod of around 30 pilot whales became stranded on Bruny Island, south of the Tasmanian state capital Hobart, on Thursday, wildlife authorities said.

A pod of around 30 pilot whales became stranded on Bruny Island, south of the Tasmanian state capital Hobart, on Thursday, wildlife authorities said.

Department of Parks and Wildlife spokeswoman Liz Wren told the Hobart Mercury newspaper that 12 of the were still alive with people on the beach trying to move them back into the water.

"Preliminary reports indicate around 30 whales have stranded with some believed to be still alive," a statement from the department said.

Initial reports indicated they were .

Whale strandings happen periodically in Tasmania, but scientists do not know why they happen.

Explore further: Whales die in Tasmanian stranding

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Birthmark
not rated yet Mar 17, 2011
I heard animals kill themselves just like humans (obviously since it's a chemical imbalance in the head) and whales will beach themselves. Interesting; we could learn a LOT about ourselves by studying animals.
6_6
3.7 / 5 (3) Mar 18, 2011
I'd leave the water too if i was being bombarded with millions of man-made ultrasonic and subsonic frequencies..
pres68y
3 / 5 (2) Mar 18, 2011
You can thank the US Navy for most of it with
their submarine scanning devices.
El_Nose
not rated yet Mar 18, 2011
comparing this to suicide is a little off @bithrmark

this would be the equivalent of a mass suicide cult... is there a run on nike's
Birthmark
not rated yet Mar 25, 2011
comparing this to suicide is a little off @bithrmark

this would be the equivalent of a mass suicide cult... is there a run on nike's


Haha true, but hell we know nothing about animals and how they communicate. This wouldn't be the first incident of mass suicide in recorded history...

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