Engineering students design a lock picking robot

Mar 10, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog
Engineering students design a lock picking robot

(PhysOrg.com) -- Crimes are usually committed by humans. As it turns out, we are not only making crime happen on our own, but we are designing robots to help us in our extra-legal endeavors. I don't know what the students at the Olin College of Engineering are up to in their spare time, but they have taken the time to design a robot that picks locks for them. This robot can not only pick a lock, but it can find the combination to any Masterlock lock in under two hours, without resorting to a chisel and hammer. If you have one number things will go much quicker. You won't get to class in time, but you can do a stealthy pilfering with it, if you have at least half an hour of uninterrupted time to work with.

The is surprisingly simple in its design. It all starts with a clamp that is designed to hold the lock in its place. The combination of a thumb-screw, a puller, and a solenoid-controlled grabber then proceed to yank the loop of the lock and give a shot at opening the . If this first step is not successful a stepper-motor will engage, turning the knob and dials in various combination's until it finds the correct one. This hardware, combined with companion that is known as LockCracker, will keep an eye on what works and what does not. When it finds the correct combination it will actually display the code for future use.

For now the device it too big to be used by home invaders, so you will not have to deal with it in the near future. No commercial applications have been given at this time, and the device is not expected to go on sale.

Explore further: Robots recognize humans in disaster environments

More information: students.olin.edu/2013/jnoglow… ker/The_Project.html

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User comments : 8

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trekgeek1
not rated yet Mar 10, 2011
Interesting, but if it just tries all combinations through brute force, there is probably a better way to do it. Perhaps you can have the tension mechanism "feel" for any give in the lock as the correct pins or whatever a padlock uses, are aligned. Just like a professional thief probably wouldn't try all combinations, but rather listen with his ear.
PS3
not rated yet Mar 10, 2011
don't they already have auto pick guns? sounds like a waste of time
jamesrm
not rated yet Mar 11, 2011
"don't they already have auto pick guns? sounds like a waste of time"

Yeah they work great on a "Rotary Combination lock"
duh

rgds
jms
PS3
1 / 5 (1) Mar 11, 2011
"don't they already have auto pick guns? sounds like a waste of time"

Yeah they work great on a "Rotary Combination lock"
duh

rgds
jms


combination is pointless when take so long,may as well just use bolt cutter.
Calenur
not rated yet Mar 11, 2011
There are already tools for rotary combination locks as well, however this is a more elegant solution. This wouldn't leave forensic evidence of a break-in, which is quite handy if anybody inspects the lock.
ereneon
not rated yet Mar 11, 2011
Great student project! Often the best educational student projects are wacky yet relatively simple things like this.
Eric_B
not rated yet Mar 15, 2011
mmm... a well-placed strike with a regular hammer pops those things every time.
Norezar
not rated yet Apr 10, 2011
Pretty good project.

Creative, too.