Space image: On approach

March 2, 2011
Image Credit: Rob Bullen (Used by permission)

After a very cloudy day at Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire, England, the skies cleared to allow a view of this stunning pass of the ISS and Discovery on Feb. 26, 2011.

Photographer Rob Cullen, who captured this breath-taking view of the and the space station, said, "I could not believe the timing was so fortuitous to show the shuttle closing in on the station."

"I captured this, what I guess could potentially be, a once in a lifetime image of these two spaceships traveling as separate craft using Canon EOS 40D using eyepiece projection through a hand guided 8.5 inch Newton."

Explore further: Space Station Construction Visible in Backyard Telescopes

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