Silk protein boosts e-book efficiency: scientists

Mar 06, 2011
Live silkworms are seen here feeding on mulberry leaves at an exhibition in Bangalore in 2001. Taiwanese scientists say they have discovered that a protein created by silkworms in the production of silk can be used to manufacture a component that will make e-books more efficient.

Taiwanese scientists said they had discovered that a protein created by silkworms in the production of silk can be used to manufacture a component that will make e-books more efficient.

Silk fibroin can be used in transistors, which are used in e-paper, and increase their efficiency, according to a research paper presented by the scientists from National Tsing Hua University in the northern city of Hsinchu, on Sunday.

"The transmission of electronic signals on the transistors using fibroin is about 20 times faster," Peter Hwang, a professor from the university's Materials Science and Engineering Department and the head of the research team, told AFP on Sunday.

"That means the page-turning speed of e-books will become faster," he said, adding that such components could also be used in next-generation flexible displays.

Hwang said the substance was likely to be available on the market within the next three years.

The team's research paper was recently published in the Germany-based periodical Advanced Materials.

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ET3D
3 / 5 (1) Mar 06, 2011
What an uninformative news item. Granted it's a copy of a press release that every site in the world published verbatim, and at least Physorg linked to the publication, but I couldn't find the article there probably because its description has little to do with what's in the news item.

I'd love to know what this research really is about. "20 times faster" than an unidentified quantity is meaningless and page turning speed of e-paper in general has little to do with transistor speed, so I'm left completely baffled by this article.

I sometimes with there was more real science reporting, something that would stop meaningless items like this, ask questions, and convert the results to a readable piece.
kaasinees
1 / 5 (1) Mar 06, 2011
Its called refresh times.

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