Samsung makes 1TB hard drive platters

Mar 08, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog
Inside view of a hard disk. Image: Wikipedia.

(PhysOrg.com) -- The world of hardware is, in some ways, an arms race. We want it faster, smaller, with a longer battery life, and with more storage. While we cannot always get all of those things from one device, when one of them is done really well, or really big, it is usually enough to garner attention, and today all eyes are on Samsung.

They have found a way to build platters for hard drives that are 1TB. That means that they will be able to build 4TB hard drives for computers in the near future, and not just for desktops. also showed off a 1TB drive with two platters that clocks in at just 2.5-inchs, a standard size that is compatible with most average notebooks.

This news is of note because right now companies can only produce 3TB hard drives, with each of the platters coming in at 750MB, and a height of 3.5-inches. No doubt that when these devices come to market the 3TB devices will drop in price. Not that you should be holding your breath. Samsung did not give any information on when the 4TB hard drives are going to put into products for sales to consumers.

The company did say that when the new 4TB hard drives are released that they will be used in the the company's Spinpoint EcoGreen F6 series. In these machines the hard drives will have a 5,400RPM rotational speed, 32MB of cache and a SATA 6Gbps interface.

In a more ambitious plan for the future Samsung mentioned that, with some modifications, this technology could also allow for the creation of 10TB drives, though no specifics were given on this tantalizing prospect.

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User comments : 4

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droid001
5 / 5 (1) Mar 09, 2011
HDD will disappear within five years. I mean the mechanical HDD. With SSD and 1Gbit/s network - who needs them?
fmfbrestel
3 / 5 (2) Mar 09, 2011
With SSD and 1Gbit/s network - who needs them?


Network operators will still need them. Google, Facebook, Salesforce, Amazon, ect.. they will all need high capacity hard disks. Solid state drives are unlikely to offer superior capacity or reliability for a long time. A 4TB solid state drive with the same form factor is a very long time off, and it's not like HDD development is just going to stop while the SSD's play catch up.
J-n
3.5 / 5 (2) Mar 09, 2011
Price will always be a concern, i suspect that SSDs will always be more expensive than traditional hdds.

With re-write concerns as well with SSDs, i am unsure how their lifespan stacks up with traditional HDDs.

I personally think that both will have their niches in the future.
unknownorgin
not rated yet Mar 16, 2011
Like all mechanical devices a hard drive will wear out. The transistor in the right conditions can last for centurys.