Russian rocket ride: $63 million per US astronaut

Mar 14, 2011

(AP) -- The Russians are hiking the price of rocket rides again for U.S. astronauts - to nearly $63 million.

The price goes up in 2014 for an astronaut to fly to and from the on a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. NASA announced the news Monday.

The previous contract charged just under $56 million apiece

The contract extension with the Russian Space Agency totals $753 million. That covers trips for a dozen from 2014 through 2016.

NASA officials say inflation is the reason for the latest price increase.

chief Charles Bolden says it's critical for U.S. companies to take over this transportation job. Space shuttles used to do that job. They're being retired this summer.

Explore further: SpaceX making Easter delivery of station supplies (Update 2)

More information: NASA: http://www.nasa.gov

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bluehigh
not rated yet Mar 15, 2011
They are not US astronauts anymore but just American space tourists on long stay visits to the latest Russian space station.

whalio
not rated yet Mar 15, 2011
I wish they had just cut us off completely in order to force the US into giving out more contracts to the private sector. Ridiculous sums of money to be handing out to the Russians just to ferry us back and forth. As usual the US drops the ball.
rwinners
not rated yet Mar 15, 2011
Hey, just like the price of gas.

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