Rare Sumatran tiger killed by electric fence

March 25, 2011
A 12-year-old Sumatran tiger named "Trenggani" jumps into the water within its enclosure at Ragunan Zoo in Jakarta in 2010. An endangered Sumatran tiger has died after brushing against an electric fence set up by Indonesian farmers, in the second such incident this year, an official said Friday.

An endangered Sumatran tiger has died after brushing against an electric fence set up by Indonesian farmers, in the second such incident this year, an official said Friday.

There are fewer than 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild and environmental activists say the animals are increasing coming into contact with people as a result of their being lost due to deforestation.

The two-metre (six foot) male was electrocuted on Monday in Jambi province in the centre of , Indonesia's largest island, a provincial conservation agency chief, Trisiswo, told AFP.

He said it was the second time this year a tiger had died as a result of the electric fences installed by locals to protect palm oil plantations.

"The tiger's body was partly charred but unlike the first incident, the body was still intact," he said. Locals had sold some of the body parts of the tiger that was killed last month.

Trisiswo said people in the village of Air Laut Hitam village had encircled their palm oil plantations with the high-voltage electric wires to keep out and had refused to abide by local rules banning the practice.

"We reported the case to local police to act firmly against them and we'll cooperate with local administration to stop this dangerous practice," he said.

Explore further: Body part by body part, Sumatran tigers are being sold into extinction

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