Potential new treatment to reduce the burden of atherosclerosis in acute coronary syndrome patients

Mar 15, 2011

The Montreal Heart Institute today announced the start of the Phase 2 CHI-SQUARE (Can HDL Infusions Significantly QUicken Atherosclerosis
REgression?) study of CER-001 in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), in collaboration with Cerenis Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel high-density lipoprotein (HDL) therapies to treat cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

CER-001 is an innovative complex of recombinant human ApoA-I, the major structural protein of HDL, and phospholipids. It has been designed to mimic the structure and function of natural, nascent HDL, also known as pre-beta HDL, which is believed to be protective against atherosclerosis. It is hoped that CER-001 will further reduce in high-risk patients by promoting removal of cholesterol from the vessel wall.

The double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, safety and efficacy study will assess the ability of CER-001 to regress coronary atherosclerotic plaque as measured by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). The study will include over 500 patients at fifty centers in the US, Canada and Europe, and will evaluate three different dose levels given in six weekly intravenous infusions.

The study is being done in collaboration with the Global Atherothrombotic Investigative Network (GAIN). Dr. Jean-Claude Tardif, Director of the Research Centre at the Montreal Heart Institute, is serving as the principal investigator. "We are excited to be conducting the CHI-SQUARE study, which aims to show benefits of CER-001 on atherosclerotic plaque following a short course of therapy." said Dr. Tardif. "This is the largest IVUS study conducted with a pre-beta HDL mimetic, and represents a potential new treatment paradigm to reduce the burden of atherosclerosis."

Pre-beta HDL is believed to protect against cardiovascular disease by removing cholesterol and other lipids from tissues including the arterial wall and transporting them to the liver for elimination. The aim for the clinical use of a recombinant ApoA-I HDL mimetic is to stimulate cholesterol removal in a process known as reverse lipid transport.

"Following the excellent safety and tolerability Phase I results with CER-001, this trial will evaluate the efficacy in ACS patients," said Jean-Louis Dasseux, CEO of Cerenis. "The potential of HDL therapy is well recognized and CER-001, as a first in class pre-beta HDL mimetic, could have great therapeutic value to patients with ACS."

Explore further: West Africa's Ebola outbreak prompts changes in I.Coast cuisine

Provided by Montreal Heart Institute

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Two expats die of MERS in Saudi commercial hub

9 hours ago

Two foreigners died of MERS in the Saudi city of Jeddah, the health ministry said Saturday, as fears rise over the spreading respiratory virus in the kingdom's commercial hub.

UAE reports 12 new cases of MERS

9 hours ago

Health authorities in the United Arab Emirates have announced 12 new cases of infection by the MERS coronavirus, but insisted the patients would be cured within two weeks.

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

21 hours ago

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.

Easter morning delivery for space station

Space station astronauts got a special Easter treat: a cargo ship full of supplies. The shipment arrived Sunday morning via the SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule.