Treating peanut allergy through a patch

Mar 02, 2011

Can your peanut-allergic child be treated by simply wearing a patch? That’s what researchers at National Jewish Health are investigating. National Jewish Health, along with four other institutions in the Consortium of Food Allergy Research (CoFAR), are currently testing the safety of a peanut patch.

The peanut patch would seek to desensitize allergic patients by exposing them to increasing amounts of peanut protein, similar to the way shots can desensitize people to pollen. The protein would be delivered through the skin from a patch, like nicotine patches used by people trying to quit tobacco.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

“We currently treat food allergy using oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy or drops under the tongue, but if this patch proves successful, it would likely be a much more convenient treatment option for patients and their families,” said David Fleischer, MD, Pediatric Allergist at National Jewish Health.

Currently patients undergoing immunotherapy need to receive progressively higher doses of their allergenic food protein in their doctor’s office on a regular basis. Researchers hope that the patch could be administered at home and would eliminate the number of office visits.

The peanut patch is currently undergoing a rigorous safety trial. If the safety trial is successful, researchers hope to begin clinical trials to determine if the patch works to desensitize patients allergic to peanut.

“We have a long way to go to determine if this is a viable and safe way to treat peanut allergy,” said Dr. Fleischer. “However, this is potentially a very exciting advance in the treatment of food allergies.”

Explore further: With kids in school, parents can work out

Provided by National Jewish Health

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers evaluating food allergy treatment

Apr 17, 2008

Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center are conducting trials to evaluate a method to prevent allergic reactions to food. They are feeding peanut- and egg-allergic people increasing doses of an investigational ...

Peanut allergies overstated, study finds

May 16, 2007

Despite hundreds of families being told their children have peanut allergies every year, many of the children may be able to eat peanuts safely, a study by researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and Sydney ...

Canberra parents lack allergy awareness: Study

Mar 17, 2009

Nearly four per cent of ACT kindergarten children have a peanut allergy and while the region's schools are well prepared to cope with this, some parents are taking inappropriate action when dealing with their child's allergy, ...

Recommended for you

With kids in school, parents can work out

22 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Back-to-school time provides an opportunity for parents to develop an exercise plan that fits into the family schedules, an expert suggests.

Obama offers new accommodations on birth control

Aug 22, 2014

The Obama administration will offer a new accommodation to religious nonprofits that object to covering birth control for their employees. The measure allows those groups to notify the government, rather than their insurance ...

Use a rule of thumb to control how much you drink

Aug 22, 2014

Sticking to a general rule of pouring just a half glass of wine limits the likelihood of overconsumption, even for men with a higher body mass index. That's the finding of a new Iowa State and Cornell University ...

User comments : 0