Mystery over dead fish in California harbor

Mar 08, 2011
Fishermen unload anchovies from a fishing boat in 2004. Californian fishermen and harbor chiefs were puzzled after millions of dead anchovies were found floating in a marina just south of Los Angeles on Tuesday.

Californian fishermen and harbor chiefs were puzzled after millions of dead anchovies were found floating in a marina just south of Los Angeles on Tuesday.

Experts said the fish, found at a harbor in Redondo Beach, may have from lack of oxygen due to , while locals wondered if high winds overnight might have something to do with it.

"It looks like what happens to when you don’t change the water in the tank, mouth open and belly up," said local official Bill Workman, cited by the Los Angeles Times newspaper.

"There are no visible signs of any toxins that might have caused (the deaths) and our early assessment is that this was oxygen depletion," he said, adding: "There are no oil slicks or leaking of substances into the water."

Locals at Redondo Beach, where the stench from the dead fish hung over King Harbor, suggested that high winds could have driven the fish into the harbor, where their sheer numbers would have reduced the oxygen available.

Experts were cautious. "What we're trying to tease apart is whether it's a consequence of algal buildup, a buildup or something toxic in the water," said David Caron of the University of Southern California.

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Howhot
1 / 5 (1) Mar 09, 2011
Back in the 70's we had a huge fish kill in a near by creek and I remember it to this day. I was caused by some root killer that leaked from a pipe into the creek. It killed everything for miles down stream. 40 years later, and the creek has never recovered.

The picture reminded me of that fish kill from that creek.