US detects 'minuscule' radioactivity from Japan

Mar 18, 2011

A radiation monitor in California detected a "minuscule" amount of an isotope from Japan's crippled nuclear power plant, officials said Friday, but insisted it was of no concern.

In the first confirmation of radioactivity having reached the US mainland, the (EPA) said the monitor in Sacramento had detected "minuscule quantities of the xenon-133.

"The origin was determined to be consistent with a release from the Fukushima reactors in northern Japan," it added in a joint statement with the Department of Energy.

The levels detected were some 0.1 disintegrations per second per cubic meter of air (0.1 Bq/m3) -- about one-millionth of the dose a person normally receives from rocks, bricks, the sun and other natural background sources.

Similar readings were detected in Washington State, further up the US west coast, on Wednesday and Thursday, it said, adding that Xenon-133 is a gas produced in "that poses no concern at the detected level."

"These types of readings remain consistent with our expectations since the onset of this tragedy, and are to be expected in the coming days."

Overall, however, the EPA's network of radiation sensors across the US mainland, as well as in Hawaii and Guam in the Pacific, "has not detected any radiation levels of concern," the statement added.

"In addition to EPA's RadNet system, the US Department of Energy has radiation monitoring equipment at research facilities around the country, which have also not detected any of concern," it added.

US authorities including President Barack Obama have repeatedly said they expect no harmful levels of radiation to reach the US or its territories in the Pacific.

But concerns over fallout from the Fukushima power plant, crippled by last Friday's killer earthquake and tsunami, led to a rush to stockpile , which can protect against radiation.

The Sacramento monitor was part of a network feeding data to the Vienna-based Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization, designed to detect "an underground nuclear test on the other side of the world."

"These detectors are extremely sensitive and can detect minute amounts of radioactive materials," it added.

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User comments : 3

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rgwalther
5 / 5 (1) Mar 19, 2011
"The plague!", yelled Pseudolus running wildly into the forum, "The Plague!" The forum shoppers, soldiers and slave alike all panic and run screaming in myriad directions. Once again Pseudolus escapes from the potentially dire effects of his most recent 'con'. The West Coast radiation is ONE Millionth of normal background radiation?
On the tech/weird side, why would anyone build a nuclear plant which requires an uninterruptible power supply to function during a disaster? A disaster, that by its very nature, can destroy or even disable the required power suppy. With the psycho news media screaming 'radiation' like Pseudolus and his 'plague', real information is lost or mangled under an irresistable tsunami of blathering, ignorant/evil media hacks.
There is good information out there, but it is lost under the rabid, mouth foam from our 'reporters'.
Too much info is the same as no information. Welcome to the reality of the fuzzy now.
StarDust21
not rated yet Mar 19, 2011
that is enough to scare the uneducated people
rwinners
not rated yet Mar 20, 2011
"A radiation monitor in California detected a "minuscule" amount of an isotope from Japan's crippled nuclear power plant, officials said Friday, but insisted it was of no concern."

Who wrote this? This is Physorg, NOT some scummy local news paper seeking sales.

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