Mandated change in light bulbs to occur at year's end

Mar 01, 2011
Mandated change in light bulbs to occur at year's end

Get ready for some mandated changes in lighting, warns an energy expert in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Effective Jan. 1, 2012, it will be a federal offense for any company, organization or individual in the United States to manufacture or import 100-watt incandescent light bulbs for general-use lighting. Dennis Buffington, professor of agricultural engineering, said California already has banned the 100-watt starting this year. The reason for the ban is the availability of other lighting alternatives today that are considerably more energy-efficient than the incandescent bulbs.

"You can continue using your 100-watt incandescent bulbs next year, and you can replace those bulbs with other 100-watt incandescents that you may have in inventory," Buffington said. "But you will be unable to purchase the bulbs after Jan. 1, 2012. In fact, you may not be able to find them in stores during the last few months of 2011."

Smaller sizes of incandescent bulbs for general use will be banned at later dates. Effective Jan. 1, 2013, 75-watt incandescent bulbs will face a similar ban; the 60-watt and 40-watt incandescents will be banned effective Jan.1, 2014.

"Specialty incandescent bulbs will not be subject to these bans," Buffington said. "Specialty bulbs include three-way bulbs, appliance lights, 'bug lights,' colored bulbs, vibration-service and rough-service bulbs, and bulbs used for marine and mining applications."

When searching for an alternative to incandescent bulbs, Buffington advised, evaluate the lights on the basis of lighting efficiency, expressed as lumens per watt. The wattage rating of a bulb merely indicates the wattage of required for input to the bulb. The light output is measured in lumens. Thus, lighting efficiency is expressed as lumens per watt.

"The compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) produces about four times the amount of light that an incandescent bulb produces on a per-watt basis," Buffington explained. "An additional benefit is that the CFL has a life span of about 10,000 hours versus 1,000 hours for a typical incandescent. A disadvantage of the CFL is that the bulb contains both mercury and lead -- potentially hazardous heavy metals."

Although CFL bulbs contain significantly less mercury and lead than they did a decade ago, the bulbs still must be handled in a responsible manner for disposal, Buffington cautioned. Most "big box" home improvement stores now have drop-off sites for proper disposal of the burned-out CFL bulbs, he pointed out.

CFLs now are available in many different sizes, shapes and colors of light (soft white, cool white, warm glow, etc.). The typical CFL sold today is a coiled tube, although some are available with an outer glass shell that hides the coil. The bulbs with the covered coils look like incandescents but with the efficiency and long life of CFLs.

"CFLs that can be used with dimmer switches now are available," Buffington said. "Be careful though. Only the CFLs that are labeled as dimmable on the packaging will function properly when used with a dimmer switch.

"LED (light-emitting diode) bulbs are even more efficient than the CFL, and the life of an is longer than the CFL," he said. "LEDs are free of both mercury and lead. But I do not recommend LEDs today simply because they still are too expensive, although the prices have dropped in recent years. I anticipate significant reductions in the price of LEDs within the next five years or so, and then they may be feasible lighting alternatives."

Explore further: Going nuts? Turkey looks to pistachios to heat new eco-city

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Lights out for old 100-watt bulbs in EU next week

Aug 26, 2009

Old-style 100-watt light bulbs will be banned in Europe's shops from next week in favour of new energy-saving models, but consumers groups on Wednesday gave the move a guarded welcome.

Care for some light music? LEDs make it possible

May 12, 2010

(AP) -- Light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, are starting to become cost-effective alternatives to standard light bulbs and fluorescent tubes. That opens up some interesting possibilities, such as the combination ...

LEDs bringing good things to light

Jul 01, 2010

Forecasting the future of technology is anything but an exact science. In late 2006, for instance, my colleagues and I put together an article outlining our predictions for the top 10 tech trends for 2007. My record was, ...

Recommended for you

Obama launches measures to support solar energy in US

Apr 17, 2014

The White House Thursday announced a series of measures aimed at increasing solar energy production in the United States, particularly by encouraging the installation of solar panels in public spaces.

Tailored approach key to cookstove uptake

Apr 17, 2014

Worldwide, programs aiming to give safe, efficient cooking stoves to people in developing countries haven't had complete success—and local research has looked into why.

User comments : 7

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Bob_B
1 / 5 (1) Mar 01, 2011
Now, when will the stores that sell them be 'forced' to accept them for recycling?

Asking the consumer to buy them and when they fail they have to thrown away! Pretty stupid, just like most politicians.
Doug_Huffman
1 / 5 (2) Mar 01, 2011
Asking the consumer to buy them and when they fail they have to thrown away! Pretty stupid, just like most politicians.
...they have to thrown away while containing 5 milligrams of mercury.
barakn
not rated yet Mar 01, 2011
"Most "big box" home improvement stores now have drop-off sites for proper disposal of the burned-out CFL bulbs, he pointed out."
Shootist
1 / 5 (1) Mar 01, 2011
I have several cases of Mr. Edison's light bulb. I'll wait for something better than those vile CFCs.
lighthouse10
not rated yet Mar 02, 2011
All lights have their advantages, including simple regular
incandescents over halogens.
The ban is not like a normal ban on an unsafe product like lead paint,
but simply to reduce electricity use:

Yet, even if there are electricity savings, citizens pay for the electricity they use:
There is no energy shortage including of future low
emission electricity, that justifies telling people what they can use in their homes.

Besides, even if if there was a shortage of the finite coal/oil/gas
energy sources, then their price rise limits their use anyway - without legislation.

Moreover: light bulbs don't give out any CO2 gas - power plants might.
If there is an energy supply/emissions problem - deal with the problem!

Why society energy savings are not there anyway:
ceolas.net website
with US Dept of Energy references = Under 1% society energy savings from regulations on incandescent lights.
The site also covers the unpublicised industrial politics involved...
Negative
not rated yet Mar 02, 2011
now, now!

"Although CFL bulbs contain significantly less mercury and lead than they did a decade ago, the bulbs still must be handled in a responsible manner for disposal, Buffington cautioned. "

""LEDs are free of both mercury and lead."

in a parallel article, "Shedding light on risks of LEDs":

"Low-intensity red lights contained up to eight times the amount of lead allowed under California law"

what a mess.

Shelgeyr
1 / 5 (2) Mar 03, 2011
That reminds me - I'd better stock up! The black market is going to be huge on this!

More news stories

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

A homemade solar lamp for developing countries

(Phys.org) —The solar lamp developed by the start-up LEDsafari is a more effective, safer, and less expensive form of illumination than the traditional oil lamp currently used by more than one billion people ...

UAE reports 12 new cases of MERS

Health authorities in the United Arab Emirates have announced 12 new cases of infection by the MERS coronavirus, but insisted the patients would be cured within two weeks.

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...