Close lunar orbit causes high waves in Honduras

Mar 25, 2011

(AP) -- The Honduran government says unusually high waves almost 8 feet (2.4 meters) tall have destroyed more than a dozen food stalls and homes and a lot of palm trees on the country's Pacific Coast.

Honduras' Permanent Contingency Commission says no one was injured in the inundation Thursday.

The washed nearly 200 feet (60 meters) inland in a tourist zone about 93 miles (150 kilometers) south of Tegucigalpa.

The commission says the waves were caused by the gravity of the , whose elliptical orbit last week reached its closest point to Earth since 1993. The phenomenon can cause abnormally high tides.

The commission is urging 20,000 people in 30 Honduran communities to take precautions and stay away from the beaches.

Explore further: Scientists may be cracking mystery of big 1872 earthquake

5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Samoan Tsunami wave was 46 feet high

Dec 04, 2009

(AP) -- The tsunami that killed more than 200 people in the Samoan islands and Tonga earlier this year towered up to 46 feet (14 meters) high - more then twice as tall as most of the buildings it slammed into, scientists ...

Honduras says trees slowed hurricane

Sep 07, 2007

Honduran President Manuel Zelaya credited the country's forests and mangrove swamps with sapping some of Hurricane Felix's strength.

Measuring a monster

Jun 10, 2005

Highlights from final report on December 26, 2004 tsunami's impact in Banda Aceh Waves more than 15 meters (49 feet) high. Flooding of 25 square miles of land. A coastline moved a mile. In a brief report in the June 9, 200 ...

Tsunami created swells worldwide

Aug 27, 2005

Last year's Indian Ocean tsunami was so powerful it circled the globe twice and high waves were recorded in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Peru, an analysis shows.

Recommended for you

Questions of continental crust

19 hours ago

Geological processes shape the planet Earth and are in many ways essential to our planet's habitability for life. One important geological process is plate tectonics – the drifting, colliding and general ...

Better forecasts for sea ice under climate change

Nov 25, 2014

University of Adelaide-led research will help pinpoint the impact of waves on sea ice, which is vulnerable to climate change, particularly in the Arctic where it is rapidly retreating.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.