New 'missing link' dinosaur discovered in Argentina

Mar 23, 2011
Handout picture released by the Museo Paleontologico Trelew showing a real-size replica of the fossil of a Taquetrensis Leonerasaurus dinosaur being exhibited at the museum, in Neuquen, Argentina. Scientists in southern Argentina discovered fossils from this previously unknown species of dinosaur, a herbivore of about three metres long precursor of the great herbivores.

Fossils of a recently discovered dinosaur species in Argentina is a "missing link" in the evolution of the long-necked giants that roamed the earth millions of years ago, paleontologists said.

Long-neck, long-tail plant-eaters like Diplodocus, and Brontomerus -- the largest land creatures ever to walk on earth -- are known as sauropods. They lived some 170 million years ago.

Paleontologists see the recently discovered Leonerasaurus Taquetransis as the connection between the smaller prosauropods -- also known as near-sauropods -- like Sellosaurus and Plateosaurus from the (248-205 million years ago) to their much larger descendants, the sauropods.

Leonerasaurus lived some 10 million years before the sauropods and measured a mere three meters (yards) long, said Diego Pol with the Egidio Feruglio Museum of Paleontology.

"The importance of this find is that it is a new species. It gives us information on the origin of the sauropods," Pol told AFP.

Leonerasaurus is "a very primitive species... that helps us understand the of the giants that appeared later," Pol said.

Pol said he made the find along with a geologist and a student in the southern Patagonian mountains of Taquetran at a site with fossil remains from the (206-144 million years ago).

The team however did not find a complete Leonerasaurus. "Parts of the skull and the tail are missing. But the backbone, the hips, front and back legs are there," Pol said.

Argentina earned fame as a prime site for dinosaur fossil hunters starting in the 1980s with several discoveries, including the Argentinosaurus Huinculensis, a giant herbivore measuring more than 40 meters (131 feet) long that lived 98 million years ago.

Later, in 1993, scientists found remains of the Giganotosaurus Carolinii, a T-Rex type creature that is the largest known carnivorous dinosaur ever found.

Pol is the co-author of an article announcing the Leonerasaurus discovery that appeared January in the journal Plos One.

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User comments : 8

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gvgoebel
5 / 5 (2) Mar 23, 2011
Cringe ... "Missing Link". Well, they at least they didn't put it in the article, and didn't say things like "magic bullet" or "holy grail" or ...
lexington
5 / 5 (1) Mar 23, 2011
A-hah, I've got you now science. There are two missing links now. Between this and the one before ti and between this and the one after it!
kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (10) Mar 24, 2011
That's the problem for evolution: Find one "missing link" and you have to produce another two because the gaps are still just too big. It'll still require an absolute miracle of miracles to make the jump between the features found on one versus what is found on the next thing in the chain.

All creatures were originally herbivores right after creation, so finding these huge animals as herbivores should be no surprise - except for evolutionists. Only after the global flood did God allow people [and by implication, animals] to start eating animals. Before that "we" were also vegetarian.

Ethelred
5 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2011
That's the problem for evolution: Find one "missing link" and you have to produce another two because the gaps are still just too big.
Amazing. Kevin took a joke and is going to pretend its real.

It'll still require an absolute miracle of miracles to make the jump between the features found on one versus what is found on the next thing in the chain.
Oh bullshit. All it takes is time mutations and natural selection. No one has ever seen one thing in any form of life that cannot be produced that way.

All creatures were originally herbivores right after creation,
Is that why all sharks and T-Rexs have sharp teeth? No. First the world is vastly older than you want and second all those sharp toothed buggers have been around for millions of years.

so finding these huge animals as herbivores should be no surprise - except for evolutionists.
Why? There were carnivores living at the same time. The earliest known dinosaurs were carnivores.

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Ethelred
5 / 5 (1) Mar 24, 2011
Only after the global flood did God allow people [and by implication, animals] to start eating animals.
And when was that flood and why did people have cutting teeth for as long as we have existed? Because your full of crap is why.

Before that "we" were also vegetarian.
Last time humans were exclusively vegetarians they weren't human. They were Australopithecus and even they might have eaten some meat. Chimps do.

So since YOU brought up the Flood you must know when it happened. When did Jehovah commit that of genocide anyway? It would have been genocide by definition. Sure had to have killed more than 10 percent of the human race. Remember I am not accusing Jehovah of anything. The Bible did that. I am just pointing out what the alleged event qualifies as.

So when was it? Goodbye Kevin.

Ethelred
Greenhorn
5 / 5 (4) Mar 24, 2011
@Kevin

I don't often comment but I've seen many of yours and have wondered, what is your goal? To me it seems that your goal is for people to give up on research since the Bible is the only source of knowledge needed. Why dig up fossils, there is no evolution. Why investigate DNA, there is no evolution? Etc etc etc. Basically we should give up on science and study the Bible. Of course this probably means moving back into caves since our modern lifestyle has grown out of scientific works. I think you should be a true leader and be the first one to move into one. Set an example for us all to live by. We'll all applaud your efforts.
Pkunk_
5 / 5 (2) Mar 27, 2011
@Kevin

I don't often comment but I've seen many of yours and have wondered, what is your goal? To me it seems that your goal is for people to give up on research since the Bible is the only source of knowledge needed. Why dig up fossils, there is no evolution. Why investigate DNA, there is no evolution? Etc etc etc. Basically we should give up on science and study the Bible. Of course this probably means moving back into caves since our modern lifestyle has grown out of scientific works. I think you should be a true leader and be the first one to move into one. Set an example for us all to live by. We'll all applaud your efforts.


It is a common feature of all "people of the book" . Like frogs in a well they cling to their utter belief in only the "book" in-spite of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. Its the evangalicals today , the Shias and Sunnis tomorrow.

It'll never stop until these numbskull's learn belief and reality are mutually exclusive.

CSharpner
not rated yet Mar 28, 2011
All creatures were originally herbivores right after creation

And when exactly was that? 6,000 years ago? Is that why we can't see objects more than 6,000 light years away? Oh wait, we can see things about 13.7 BILLION light years away. How does that work again in a 6,000 year old universe?

Only after the global flood
Kevin... Seriously? OK, When was the flood? Why didn't the Egyptians notice it? Come on. You've been asked this a million times and every time it's asked, you scram. If you really believe these stories you're continually pushing here, stand up and be counted. Stop being an embarrassing representative for your cause.

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