Landsat 7 satellite shows tsunami effects in Sendai, Japan

Mar 18, 2011 By Mike Taylor and Rob Gutro
This false color image of Sendai, Japan was captured by the Landsat 7 ETM+ bands 4,3, and 2 on March 12, 2011 and shows inland areas inundated by water from the tsunami, smoke from fires burning, and clouds of debris in the water. Credit: USGS/NASA, Mike Taylor

Before and after images from the Landsat 7 satellite show the after effects of the tsunami that followed the 9.0 earthquake off of Japan's east coast last weekend. A side-by-side comparison reveals inland areas inundated by water from the tsunami, smoke from burning fires and clouds of debris in the water.

Images from February 24, 2011 and March 12, 2011 were created using false coloring to make features more prominent. False color Landsat 7 ETM+ bands 4, 3, and 2 were used to create the images. The Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument is a fixed "whisk-broom," eight-band, multispectral scanning radiometer capable of providing high-resolution imaging information of the Earth's surface.

This false color image of Sendai, Japan was captured by the Landsat 7 ETM+ bands 4,3, and 2 on February 24, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA, Mike Taylor

In the images from March 12, you can see water on land especially to the north of Sendai. You can also see water rise and/or inundation on the island in front of the Sendai coast. The clouds are prominent in the imagery but the inland water, debris in the ocean and smoke from the fires are still visible in the March 12 image. The black lines in the image are data band gaps.

The Landsat Program is a series of Earth-observing satellite missions jointly managed by and the U.S. Geological Survey. Since 1972, Landsat satellites have collected information about Earth from space. This science, known as , has matured with the Landsat Program.

Landsat satellites have taken specialized of Earth’s continents and surrounding coastal regions for over three decades, enabling people to study many aspects of our planet and to evaluate the dynamic changes caused by both natural processes and human practices.

Explore further: NASA provides double vision on Typhoon Matmo

More information: For more information about Landsat, visit: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ .

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA images tsunami's effects on Northeastern Japan

Mar 14, 2011

The extent of inundation from the destructive and deadly tsunami triggered by the March 11, 2011, magnitude 8.9 earthquake centered off Japan's northeastern coast about 130 kilometers (82 miles) east of the ...

NASA satellite sees area affected by Japan tsunami

Mar 16, 2011

A new before-and-after image pair from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft shows a region of Japan's northeastern coast, northeast ...

Recommended for you

Oso disaster had its roots in earlier landslides

2 hours ago

The disastrous March 22 landslide that killed 43 people in the rural Washington state community of Oso involved the "remobilization" of a 2006 landslide on the same hillside, a new federally sponsored geological study concludes.

Study finds missing piece of biogeochemical puzzle in aquifer

2 hours ago

A study published in Scienceby researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and co-authored by Georgia Tech may dramatically shift our understanding of the complex dance of microbes and minerals ...

Hurricane Imaging Radiometer prepared for deployment

3 hours ago

The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, known as HIRAD, will fly aboard one of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft during NASA's Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel or HS3 mission from Wallops beginning August 26 through ...

User comments : 0