Lambs provide crucial link in understanding obesity

Mar 14, 2011

The research, published today in The Journal of Physiology, shows a definite link between maternal and offspring obesity and is the first demonstration that this is the case in mammals which bear 'mature offspring' – as humans do.

Professor Peter Nathanielsz, lead author of the research, said: "A relationship between maternal and offspring obesity has been clearly identified in rodents but as their young are born immature, it was not clear whether the findings would apply to humans.

"Lambs offer a more similar model to understand the mechanism of human obesity as they are born at a more advanced level of maturity – equivalent to humans."

For 60 days before conception and throughout their pregnancy Nathanielsz and his team at the Center for Pregnancy and Newborn Research, University of Texas and the University of Wyoming, fed sheep either a normal diet or one that produces obesity. The appetite and weight gain of their offspring were then monitored for a further 19 months.

By taking frequent blood samples from the newborn lambs, the team were able to monitor levels of hormones that are known to affect developmental programming – in particular the hormone leptin. Leptin is produced by adipose fat cells and regulates appetite. In lambs born of normal weight mothers, there was a peak in leptin in the sixth to ninth days of life but this peak did not occur in lambs born to obese ewes.

"The neonatal peak in leptin plays a central role in the development of areas of the brain that regulate appetite. We have found that an absence of this peak in lambs born to obese mothers seems to predispose them to increased appetite and obesity in later life."

Blood samples taken from one day old lambs also found that cortisol levels were up to 50% higher in obese sheep, leading the team to suspect that exposure to higher levels of cortisol in the womb may prevent the normal leptin rise in lambs of obese mothers.

"We propose that cortisol prepares fetal adipose tissue to secrete leptin – and that this process seems to be disrupted in lambs born to obese mothers. The nutrient excess present in the blood of obese mothers throughout gestation seems to inhibit the post-natal leptin peak – which likely has important consequences for the development of the lamb."

"Given the epidemic of obesity both in the developed and developing world, the search for environmental factors occurring around the time of birth which predispose of overweight mothers to lifelong obesity is important.

"Seeing these hormonal change in lambs, in addition to what we have already found with rodents, is advancing our understanding of what programmes appetite. We are getting closer to understanding what causes obesity in humans." concluded Nathanielsz.

Explore further: Missing protein restored in patients with muscular dystrophy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Obesity: Perhaps not all hot fudge sundaes

Apr 10, 2006

University of Pittsburgh scientists say it may not be all hot fudge sundaes and french fries that cause obesity -- it might also be due to brain chemistry.

Exercise reduces hunger in lean women but not obese women

Jun 17, 2008

Exercise does not suppress appetite in obese women, as it does in lean women, according to a new study. The results were presented Tuesday, June 17, at The Endocrine Society's 90th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Recommended for you

Student seeks to improve pneumonia vaccines

11 hours ago

Almost a million Americans fall ill with pneumonia each year. Nearly half of these cases require hospitalization, and 5-7 percent are fatal. Current vaccines provide protection against some strains of the ...

Seabed solution for cold sores

12 hours ago

The blue blood of abalone, a seabed delicacy could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus following breakthrough research at the University of Sydney.

Better living through mitochondrial derived vesicles

Aug 19, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—As principal transformers of bacteria, organelles, synapses, and cells, vesicles might be said to be the stuff of life. One need look no further than the rapid rise to prominence of The ...

Zebrafish help to unravel Alzheimer's disease

Aug 19, 2014

New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study by scientists at ...

User comments : 0