Kinect for Xbox - the story behind the science

Mar 09, 2011

Have you ever wondered about the story behind one of the most exciting computer gaming inventions of late? If so you’re in luck, because Jamie Shotton, one of the developers of Kinect for Xbox, will be telling the story behind it at Cambridge Science Festival later this month.

Shotton, who studied at Queens' College Cambridge, now works for Microsoft which manufactures the and consoles.

Kinect works on the principle of something called machine learning, a modern branch of artificial intelligence. What is clever about the science behind it is that it enables the programme to work well for everyone, regardless of their shape or size. It is one of the fastest selling consumer electronics devices in history, having sold over eight million units in its first two months on the market.

It makes you the controller, as you play games with your whole body and the programme responds to your body movements direct the game.

Explaining more about how he came to invent the Kinect programme, Jamie Shotton said: "My time at Queens' included a PhD in computer vision at the Engineering Department where I focussed on automatic visual object recognition. In particular I wanted to know how we could teach computers by example to recignise different categories of object - cars, sheep, trees etc, in photographs. I turned to machine learning, a modern branch of artifical intelligence, and came up with an approach that worked."

Jamie Shotton and Chris Bishop from Microsoft Research will speak more about the story behind Kinect in the Lady Mitchell Hall at 10.30am and 12noon on Saturday 19th March. There will also be an interactive camera demonstration of the latest technology gadgets. Pre booking is advised.

Cambridge Science Festival, which takes place at venues across the University begins on Monday, March 14 and runs until March 27.

The festival attracted over 35,000 visitors in 2010 and the number is expected to be matched this year. The festival opens the doors of Cambridge University's laboratories to the public with more than 150 mostly free talks, events and workshops about science -with the aim of bringing science to life.

Explore further: Google searches hold key to future market crashes

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microsoft sells one million Kinects in 10 days

Nov 16, 2010

Microsoft said it sold one million Kinect motion-sensing controllers for the Xbox 360 videogame console in 10 days and is on pace to sell five million by the end of the year.

Microsoft to release a free SDK for Kinect this spring

Feb 22, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Kinect, Microsoft's attempt to bring motion controls to the Xbox 360 video game console, is soon to have a non-commercial SDK released for it that will hopefully allow third-party developers ...

Recommended for you

Lenovo's smart glasses prototype has battery at neck

42 minutes ago

China's PC giant Lenovo last week offered a peek at its Google Glass-competing smart glass prototype, further details of which are to be announced in October. Lenovo's glasses prototype is not an extreme ...

Google searches hold key to future market crashes

3 hours ago

A team of researchers from Warwick Business School and Boston University have developed a method to automatically identify topics that people search for on Google before subsequent stock market falls.

Amazon launches 3D printing store

3 hours ago

Amazon announced Monday the launch of an online store for 3D printed items to allow consumers to customize and personalize items like earrings, pendants, dolls and other objects.

User comments : 0