Kansas City, Kansas, wins Google broadband nod

Mar 30, 2011 by Glenn Chapman
The Google search page appears on a computer screen in Washington 2010. Google on Wednesday announced it will build its first super-fast broadband Internet network in Kansas City, Kansas.

Google announced on Wednesday that Kansas City, Kansas, had been selected as the site for its first super-fast broadband Internet network.

Nearly 1,100 US towns and cities had competed to be Google's testbed for the ultra high-speed fiber optic network which will move data 100 times faster than what is available in the United States today.

Each home, school, and business in Kansas City will eventually be linked to a "one-gigabyte backbone" for routing digital data. The service is expected to start in 2012.

"We hope to bring this same service to other nearby cities and other markets too," said Google vice president of access services Milo Medin. "This is really the beginning... we are starting here."

Google announced its plan to build an experimental high-speed Internet network a year ago.

Tactics used by cities to be selected by the California technology giant included public rallies, pitches in YouTube videos, creation of Facebook groups, and symbolically taking on the firm's name.

The United States ranked 15th in a study of Internet connectivity in countries worldwide, according to a study released in October by computer networking titan Cisco. South Korea topped the list.

The study affirmed that being ahead of the pack with Internet broadband gave countries an economic advantage and many emerging economies are "leapfrogging" old Internet technologies to go directly to high-speed networks.

The United States was not among the 14 countries that the Cisco-backed study concluded were prepared for the "Internet applications of tomorrow."

Fast and ubiquitous Internet service was described by Google executives as essential to innovation and creativity as well as to connecting people to lifestyle benefits the Digital Age has to offer.

"Speed matters immensely," said Google chief financial officer Patrick Pichette. "We're going to actually experiment to find solutions to make the Internet accessible to everybody."

Google said it planned to offer wired Internet connections to homes at a "competitive price" with people choosing their own service providers.

Reasons for picking Kansas City included being able to efficiently build the fiber network there and the potential for showcasing services that capitalize on ultra-fast data connections.

Kansas City has a population of about 146,000 people, according to recent census figures.

"Over the past decade, the jump from dial-up to broadband has led to streaming online video, digital music sales, video conferencing over the Web and countless other innovations that have transformed communication and commerce," Google's Medin said.

"We can't wait to see what new products and services will emerge as Kansas City moves from traditional broadband to ultra high-speed fiber optic connections," he said.

The Kansas City project is intended to explore new ways to deploy fiber networks as well as to see what kinds of "bandwidth-intensive killer apps" or services it inspires, according to Google.

Explore further: Scientists twist radio beams to send data: Transmissions reach speeds of 32 gigabits per second

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GSwift7
1 / 5 (1) Mar 30, 2011
Oh darn, I just moved from there to South Carolina, where I can barely stay connected for five minutes. My bad luck.

I wonder if Time Warner is going to get off their tails and start upgrading? I'd be willing to bet that this move by Google will be followed by a big push for Google TV.
CrowdedCranium
not rated yet Mar 30, 2011
Personally I am thrilled to see someone else jump in. I am stuck with SBCglobal aka AT@T. This last week I started getting several CI a day, and the speedtest says it went from roughly 4. down .5 up to almost 2. down and almost .4 up. At a savings I could go Verizon wireless and tether my home. That does not include the News that AT#T intends to cap my unlimited service starting May 2.

Thank God for competition! The more the merrier!!
trekgeek1
5 / 5 (2) Mar 31, 2011
No, no, no, no. The State that practically bans the teaching of science in the form of evolutionary biology does not get to enjoy the fruits of scientific methods. This boils my blood. I realize that the network they're getting isn't necessarily based on evolution, but the same methods were used. Scientific observation, experimentation and analysis where used. They reject these practices in biology and therefore should not be allowed to have this hypocritical network installed. This is just like creationist anti-evolutionary nut-bags getting flu shots and antibiotics when they spit in the face of research that created them. This pisses me off.
GSwift7
3 / 5 (2) Mar 31, 2011
lol Trek. That's funny. +5.

However, I'd like to point out that the religious zealots in Kansas are a vocal minority, and most of them home-school anyway. The KCK school district isn't one of the backward places you are talking about, and the State of Kansas is one of the country's top promoters of medical research. UofK and KU are both top medical and biology/genetic research universities.

What I really wonder about is why they would pick an area that is mainly inner city/urban with low income and such a small internet service market. I worked for a social services contractor who serviced that area. The average person there doesn't even own a computer. It's typical inner city with dominant minorities and such.

So I agree with you. This is a bad choice. My town would be MUCH better. :)
trekgeek1
not rated yet Mar 31, 2011
lol Trek. That's funny. +5.

However, I'd like to point out that the religious zealots in Kansas are a vocal minority, and most of them home-school anyway. The KCK school district isn't one of the backward places you are talking about, and the State of Kansas is one of the country's top promoters of medical research. UofK and KU are both top medical and biology/genetic research universities.

What I really wonder about is why they would pick an area that is mainly inner city/urban with low income and such a small internet service market. I worked for a social services contractor who serviced that area. The average person there doesn't even own a computer. It's typical inner city with dominant minorities and such.

So I agree with you. This is a bad choice. My town would be MUCH better. :)


Thanks for the information. Whenever I hear "Kansas", I think of Topeka Kansas evolution debates that started the FSM movement.
GSwift7
1 / 5 (1) Apr 01, 2011
Yeah, the Christian fundamentalists out in the boonies that make their own clothes and do their own haircuts and have bomb shelters stocked with survival gear in preparation for the Return really aren't that common. I did have a case when I did social work where one of those Christian groups was taking in foster kids so that they could brainwash them. We got involved when one of the kids died from being duct taped to a bed for several days. It was a kind of a commune thing, so it wasn't just one sick guy, it was an entire group of sick people. That wasn't in KCK though.

By the way, I have an Uncle who has told me that since I'm his favorite relative that if the end of days does come, I can take shelter with him. Boy is that a relief!!! He even offered to let me borrow a generator for Y2K. I had to hold back a smile, but I know he means well. I think he has over 200 guns in his house. :(