Holy mackerel! Plenty of fish in Acapulco seas

Mar 12, 2011
A fisherman uses a plastic bag to catch fish as a large school of fish swims near the coast of Acapulco, Mexico, Friday, March 11, 2011. According to local fishermen, they had never seen such large schools of fish swim so close to the coast.(AP Photo/Bernandino Hernandez)

(AP) -- Something fishy is up in Acapulco.

Masses of , anchovies, stripped bass and mackerel surged close to shore Friday on one beach in the Mexican resort city, packed so tightly near the surface they looked like an oil slick from above.

Delighted rushed out in wooden motor boats, abandoning their rods and nets and simply scooping the up with buckets.

"It was so much fun. There were about 20 or 30 fishermen and there were people who came with their kids to take advantage of it," fisherman Carlos Morales said.

The fishermen attributed the strange phenomenon to the unusual currents unleashed by that followed the earthquake in Japan.

Experts couldn't be sure.

"It would fall into that category where you would love to make the connection, but who knows?" said Rich Briggs, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. "Tsunamis can change local currents, but it's hard to make a firm connection."

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