Study may lead to greater understanding of human genome regulation

Mar 04, 2011

Many multi-cellular animals use sex chromosomes to determine sex. In fruit flies and in humans, this produces XX for females and XY for males. Cellular mechanisms then kick into gear to compensate the two-to-one imbalance of X-linked genes in females and males.

Victoria Meller, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences and resident of Huntington Woods, Mich., received $301,392 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to investigate the role of a type of in the X chromosome dosage compensation of Drosophila, or . The findings are likely to improve the understanding of gene regulation in humans, which employ similar cellular tools to regulate their complex genome.

Uncovering clues in genetic regulation in humans is instrumental in understanding a wide range of pathologies, including cancer, developmental abnormalities and some birth defects. The misregulation of large groups of genes is characteristic of these diseases.

There are significant differences in the way humans and fruit flies achieve X chromosome dosage compensation. "Humans double the expression of genes on the X chromosome, then deactivate one X chromosome in the female," Meller said. "Taking a much simpler approach, double the X-expression from the male X chromosome and keep the female level the same."

Although these approaches differ, humans and flies both use regulatory complexes that recognize the X chromosome. These complexes bind to and alter chromatin, the structure formed by DNA and associated proteins, to change the expression of the entire chromosome. "It's somewhat of a mystery, though, how these complexes identify the X chromosome," Meller said.

Recently, Meller's lab uncovered clues that a class of non-coding RNA called RNAi plays a role in X chromosome recognition. Her current study will explore the role of RNAi, along with short on the X chromosome, in X chromosome recognition.

Because of the similarities of human and fruit fly X chromosome recognition, findings from Meller's lab are likely to contribute to the understanding of gene regulation in humans. "Exploring how organisms achieve overall regulation of large groups of genes is basic research," said Meller. "Flies and mammals have the same tool kit for regulating their genome, and we are looking at how they use it."

"New information on how regulation works may lead to greater understanding of how those systems sometimes fail – and how future medical interventions can potentially treat these health problems," Meller said.

Explore further: Improving the productivity of tropical potato cultivation

Provided by Wayne State University

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

X chromosome exposed

May 29, 2008

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, and the EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) in Hinxton, UK, have revealed new insights into how sex chromosomes are regulated. ...

The story of X -- evolution of a sex chromosome

Apr 16, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Move over, Y chromosome - it's time X got some attention. In the first evolutionary study of the chromosome associated with being female, University of California, Berkeley, biologist Doris ...

Recommended for you

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

3 hours ago

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...

Building better soybeans for a hot, dry, hungry world

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —A new study shows that soybean plants can be redesigned to increase crop yields while requiring less water and helping to offset greenhouse gas warming. The study is the first to demonstrate ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...