Google lets searchers sidestep unwanted websites

Mar 10, 2011
Google on Tuesday began letting people sidestep unwanted websites by eliminating them from Internet search results.

Google on Tuesday began letting people sidestep unwanted websites by eliminating them from Internet search results.

"Now there's yet another way to find more of what you want on Google by blocking the sites you don't want to see," Google search quality engineers Amay Champaneria and Beverly Yang said in a blog post.

People who jump back to the Google page after checking out a link will have the option of signaling they have no interest in seeing that website suggested in the future.

"Perhaps the result just wasn't quite right, but sometimes you may dislike the site in general, whether it's offensive, pornographic or of generally low quality," the engineers said.

"For times like these, you'll start seeing a new option to block particular domains from your future search results."

A small "block" button was added to options listed with search result links.

Blocked domains are associated with people's Google accounts. Subsequent searches that would have generated the unwanted websites will show instead messages indicating they were blocked.

"We're adding this feature because we believe giving you control over the results you find will provide an even more personalized and enjoyable experience on Google," the engineers said.

The new feature began rolling out Tuesday for English-language versions of .com accessed with the latest Chrome, or Web browsing software.

It is to expand soon to other languages and browser software.

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Doug_Huffman
not rated yet Mar 10, 2011
A real small block, so small that I still have not found it. Like frog's fur, so fine that it's invisible.
Bob_Kob
5 / 5 (2) Mar 10, 2011
Great change, hopefully the days of googling something say X will not turn up a website which mereley presents a page saying 'free X here' or 'download X here' without any content of X present!
Skepticus
not rated yet Mar 11, 2011
Blocked domains are associated with people's Google accounts.


Right, so big brother can profile you from demanding your login activity from Google and whatever sites you hate to deduce your political inclination, for example,or Google will write a script to do just that and forward the thousands of most relevant suspects to the authority enmasses...National Security, you know?
PPihkala
not rated yet Mar 11, 2011
So does this mean that one has to login to google to be able to use this feature?
PaulieMac
not rated yet Mar 11, 2011
So does this mean that one has to login to google to be able to use this feature?


Yep, sure does..
Royale
2 / 5 (1) Mar 11, 2011
You could always do what I do, and LOOK AT THE SITE BEFORE YOU CLICK THE LINK... It's become inherently second nature to just skip over the crap for me, and I'm assuming a lot of other people. Sure, I have a Google account; but I will not be logging in to block domains. There's this thing called the brain and you can use it to not click on places you don't want to go.
Bob_Kob
not rated yet Mar 12, 2011
Oh yeah brilliant idea royale. We're all just a bunch of idiots... a very common thing now is a sort of website spoofing, it will appear to be what you're looking for but once you jump in it has nothing you want.
Royale
not rated yet Mar 14, 2011
Sure, spoofing has been around for years. You can't spoof a root domain that's being displayed on Google though. Use the feature if you want Bob, just know that they're keeping a list. Or you could just peek at the domain when results are displayed.