Google purges tainted apps from Android phones

March 7, 2011
A Motorola phone powered by Android. Google has remotely purged Android smartphones of applications tainted with a malicious code that could take control of the handsets and steal information.

Google has remotely purged Android smartphones of applications tainted with a malicious code that could take control of the handsets and steal information.

Mobile phone security firm LookOut said the purpose of the "DroidDream" code was to "download additional applications and install them silently as system applications on the device.

"DroidDream could be considered a powerful zombie agent that can install any applications silently and execute code with root privileges at will," it said.

was patching the vulnerability that cyber crooks could exploit and adding measures to prevent applications containing the "malware" from getting into the Android Market of programs for .

Google yanked the contaminated applications from the Android Market and then took the unusual step of hitting a "kill switch" that remotely removed from smartphones any of the more than 50 applications containing the dangerous code.

"We removed the malicious applications from Android Market, suspended the associated developer accounts, and contacted law enforcement about the attack," Rich Cannings of Android Security said in a message posted at the Google blog during the weekend.

"We are remotely removing the malicious from affected devices."

Google believed that hackers were only able to get codes identifying smartphones and which version of Android ran particular devices. The attack didn't work on handsets operating on 2.2.2 or newer.

Explore further: Google delays Android smartphone apps release in China

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semmsterr
not rated yet Mar 07, 2011
Thanks, Big Brother!
astro_optics
not rated yet Mar 07, 2011
Scary...isn't the owner at least asked?
Lupus_Lacerta
not rated yet Mar 08, 2011
But you weren't asked for the malicious applications to be installed. I would like to know if anything malicious had been installed on my phone, but grateful if it had been removed remotely.

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