Chinese perspective offers optimism for the future of oil and gas

Mar 11, 2011
This is the cover of World Atlas of Oil and Gas Basins. Credit: Wiley-Blackwell

The state of the world's oil and gas reserves is one of the great strategic issues facing the modern world. Aside from the debate and controversy surrounding the issue stands one of China's foremost petroleum geologists, Professor Li Guoyu, whose new publication, World Atlas of Oil and Gas Basins, brings together decades of research into the industry to provide an optimistic theory for the future of oil and gas.

"The new World Atlas of and Gas Basins is a culmination of my research and studies of world oil and geology carried out over the past 57 years," said Professor Guoyu. "I am pleased to let the world know that I hold an optimistic viewpoint of the world's oil and gas reserves and that my research can form a profound analysis and discussion of the past and present of oil and gas, and more importantly its future."

From the Sino-Russian steppes to the desert kingdoms of the Middle East, and from the war zones of central Africa to the rainforests of Latin America the World Atlas of Oil and Gas Basins provides a truly global perspective on the state, and future, of the .

The Atlas surveys each of the world's five continents, covering 190 countries and 507 petroliferous basins, as well as 560 big and significant oil and gas basins. The atlas provides a welcome addition to the global database of the world's energy resources and is therefore an indispensible source of information for the development of future strategies to exploit oil and gas reserves.

Combining industry knowhow with geological expertise Professor Guoyu develops a theory to suggest a larger abundance of oil and gas reserves worldwide than the conventionally pessimistic models. It concentrates on the correlation between sedimentary basins and the presence of commercially exploitable hydrocarbon reserves.

The atlas provides graphical examples of the striking interrelationships between world oil and gas reserves, production and price, which support Professor Guoyu's theoretical approach to sedimentary basins and hydrocarbon production potential.

While the World Atlas of Oil and Gas Basins is an essential reference source for petroleum geologists and reservoir engineers working in oil exploration and production, it is also a valuable teaching aid for university courses as well as a unique cartographical viewpoint of the world.

Explore further: China says massive area of its soil polluted

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New geosciences model explains ocean formation

Mar 17, 2006

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin’s Jackson School of Geosciences and the Université Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg, France, have developed a new model to explain how continents break apart to form new oceans. ...

Natural gas in the Arctic is mostly Russian

May 29, 2009

(AP) -- Nearly one-third of the natural gas yet to be discovered in the world is north of the Arctic Circle and most of it is in Russian territory, according to a new analysis led by researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey.

Geotimes explores oil around the world

Feb 04, 2008

With oil hovering around $90 a barrel, Geotimes magazine examines emerging trends and issues in several obvious, and some not-so-obvious locations, in this month’s cover story “Oil Around the World.”

Recommended for you

China says massive area of its soil polluted

3 hours ago

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

Book offers simplified guide to shale gas extraction

3 hours ago

The new book, "Science Beneath the Surface: A Very Short Guide to the Marcellus Shale," attempts to offer a reader-friendly, unbiased, scientific guide needed to make well-informed decisions regarding energy ...

New approach needed to deal with increased flood risk

4 hours ago

Considering the impacts of climate change on flood risk may not be effective unless current risk is managed better, according to new research from the University of Bristol published today in the Journal ...

Researchers question emergency water treatment guidelines

23 hours ago

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) recommendations for treating water after a natural disaster or other emergencies call for more chlorine bleach than is necessary to kill disease-causing pathogens ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

First radar vision for Copernicus

Launched on 3 April, ESA's Sentinel-1A satellite has already delivered its first radar images of Earth. They offer a tantalising glimpse of the kind of operational imagery that this new mission will provide ...

Image: Grand Canyon geology lessons on view

The Grand Canyon in northern Arizona is a favorite for astronauts shooting photos from the International Space Station, as well as one of the best-known tourist attractions in the world. The steep walls of ...

Book offers simplified guide to shale gas extraction

The new book, "Science Beneath the Surface: A Very Short Guide to the Marcellus Shale," attempts to offer a reader-friendly, unbiased, scientific guide needed to make well-informed decisions regarding energy ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...