Antioxidant compound shows promising radioprotective properties

March 21, 2011
Antioxidant compound shows promising radioprotective properties

Researchers at National Jewish Health have shown that an antioxidant compound can protect against injury to the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and the eye in a mouse model of acute exposure to ionizing radiation.

The compound, known as MnTE-2-PyP, is a form of metalloporphyrin antioxidant that is a more effective version of a naturally occurring antioxidant in the body known as superoxide dismutase. It is thousands of times more potent than that are currently available in the United States.

As part of a $9 million, five-year, grant from the US Department of Defense, National Jewish Health researchers, led by James Crapo, MD, are currently collecting safety and efficacy data to enable an application for human clinical trials, and are also pursuing methods to synthesize pharmaceutical-grade MnTE-2-PyP.

MnTE-2-PyP is being developed as a protective agent against acute radiation exposure.

Ionizing radiation leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These molecules cause damage to DNA, proteins, lipids, and ultimately, to tissue injury and death. Antioxidant therapy can be effective in reducing both the initial burst of ROS associated with and in blocking or reducing the chronic ROS production and inflammatory cascade that mediates the radiation-induced tissue injury.

Explore further: Nanoparticle shows promise in reducing radiation side effects

More information: Publication abstracts

Related Stories

Nanoparticle shows promise in reducing radiation side effects

November 8, 2006

With the help of tiny, transparent zebrafish embryos, researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Medical College are hoping to prove that a microscopic nanoparticle can be part of ...

Plant antioxidant may protect against radiation exposure

September 23, 2008

Resveratrol, the natural antioxidant commonly found in red wine and many plants, may offer protection against radiation exposure, according to a study by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. When altered with ...

Gene associated with reduced mortality from acute lung injury

January 16, 2009

Researchers at National Jewish Health and the University of Colorado Denver have discovered a gene that is associated with improved survival among patients with acute lung injury. Acute lung injury (ALI) is often caused by ...

New oral agents may prevent injury after radiation exposure

July 10, 2009

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and collaborators have discovered and analyzed several new compounds, collectively called the ''EUK-400 series,'' which could someday be used to prevent radiation-induced ...

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.