Spring allergies have arrived

Mar 18, 2011

It may look like the dead of winter outside, but the allergy season is already underway. Trees begin spreading pollen before leaves appear on their branches. Grass and weeds will begin pollinating later in the year.

"Most people associate the beginning of allergy season with flowering trees and plants, but the reality is allergy season begins much earlier, when buds on otherwise bare trees begin releasing their pollen" said Kirstin Carel, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at National Jewish Health. "People who suffer from tree allergies may already be experiencing symptoms and should begin taking steps now to minimize them."

Dr. Carel offers advice on steps you can take now to get ahead of the spring .

Know exactly what you are allergic to. See an allergist and have testing done to determine which pollens or other items (molds, pets, etc.) that you are allergic to. Specifically knowing what you are allergic to can help your allergist tailor your treatment plan.

Start your allergy medications now. Whether you take and/or oral medication begin taking your medications now before your symptoms start. Beginning those medications now can help lessen the severity of your symptoms later.

Stay consistent. Take your medications as prescribed. Constantly taking your medications will work much better with consistent use rather than used only as urgent relief.

Nasal washes can be very helpful. Many people with allergic rhinitis, , or other lung problems also have nasal and sinus symptoms. Drainage from your nose and sinuses can make rhinitis and asthma worse, especially at night. A salt-water nasal wash, or , can help reduce this.

Monitor pollen counts. Know the pollen counts each day. On high count days keep your windows closed to minimize exposure to pollens. If you have been outdoors a lot, showering before going to bed can go a long way toward helping you get a good night's sleep.

Explore further: UN implores all countries to help on Ebola

Provided by National Jewish Health

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Hay fever season peaking

Sep 03, 2007

Last month's downpour in the Midwest has triggered an increase in mold spores but dampened the U.S. pollen count -- at least temporarily.

Treating peanut allergy through a patch

Mar 02, 2011

Can your peanut-allergic child be treated by simply wearing a patch? That’s what researchers at National Jewish Health are investigating. National Jewish Health, along with four other institutions in the Consortium of ...

Nothing to sneeze at: Real-time pollen forecasts

Dec 22, 2008

Researchers in Germany are reporting an advance toward development of technology that could make life easier for millions of people allergic to plant pollen. It could underpin the first automated, real-time ...

Recommended for you

Obama addresses West Africans on facts about Ebola

4 hours ago

President Barack Obama urged West Africans on Tuesday to wear gloves and masks when caring for Ebola patients or burying anyone who died of the disease. He also discouraged the traditional burial practice ...

Gluten-free diet benefits asymptomatic EmA+ adults

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Asymptomatic individuals with endomysial antibodies (EmA) benefit from a gluten-free diet (GFD), according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

Another US health worker infected with Ebola

4 hours ago

A third American health worker has tested positive for the Ebola virus while working with patients in West Africa, the Christian missionary group SIM said Tuesday.

UN implores all countries to help on Ebola

6 hours ago

The international group Doctor Without Borders warned Tuesday that the world is 'losing the battle' against Ebola, while U.N. officials implored all countries to quickly step up their response by contributing health experts ...

Travel restrictions could worsen Ebola crisis: experts

11 hours ago

Travel restrictions could worsen West Africa's Ebola epidemic, limiting medical and food supplies and keeping out much-needed doctors, virologists said Tuesday as the disease continued its deadly spread.

User comments : 0