Ultrasound fusion imaging provides comparable accuracy for bone, soft tissue tumors

Feb 16, 2011

Biopsies using ultrasound fusion imaging for detecting bone and soft tissue cancers are safe, effective and just as accurate as conventional biopsy methods, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

Researchers found that the ultrasound fusion imaging technique guides a with precise accuracy and ease, while making the biopsy experience more convenient for patients.

Ultrasound fusion merges real-time ultrasound images with previously acquired computed tomography or scans, providing physicians with high resolution, life-like imaging to identify the area for biopsy.

This is the first time researchers compared the safety and efficacy of ultrasound fusion against conventional biopsy imaging tools like CT or MRI.

The study's findings will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Feb. 15-18 in San Diego.

"Ultrasound fusion is a viable option to consider for patients," says Michael Mott, M.D., an orthopaedic oncologist at Henry Ford and principal investigator for the study. "With imaging precision being equal, patients liked the ultrasound fusion because scheduling a biopsy was found to be more flexible for ultrasound suites than CT suites."

Bone and soft tissue cancers account for a small number of cancer cases. According to the National Cancer Institute, about less than 1 percent of all new cancer cases occur each year in the United States.

Henry Ford researchers compared the results of 44 patients from January to December in 2010 who were randomized into one of two groups: those who received an ultrasound fusion biopsy and those who received a CT biopsy. Researchers also looked at the time and ease of obtaining the biopsy and outcomes.

Dr. Mott says the accuracy for obtaining the ultrasound fusion biopsy was 93 percent compared to 90 percent for obtaining the CT biopsy. Researchers also found that the ultrasound fusion was as safe and effective as the CT biopsy.

Explore further: What are the chances that your dad isn't your dad?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Elastography helps identify patients who need biopsy

Jan 12, 2011

A new ultrasound technique is proving valuable in distinguishing malignant from benign breast lesions in some patients – results that could mean fewer unnecessary breast biopsies, a new study shows.

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 0

More news stories

How kids' brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring ...

Gate for bacterial toxins found

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible ...

Adventurous bacteria

To reproduce or to conquer the world? Surprisingly, bacteria also face this problem. Theoretical biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown how these organisms should ...