Researchers develop techniques to manipulate plant adaption in arid climates

Feb 15, 2011

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers have developed techniques to manipulate root development functionality that can help plants better adapt to hostile growing environments.

In a recent paper published in the prestigious journal The , BGU researchers were able show that by manipulating a specific gene they could impact lateral root growth. Lateral root (LR) development is a highly regulated process that determines a plant's growth and ability to adapt to life in different .

The researchers identified ABI4, a master-gene that controls LR development, then mutated the gene and constructed in which this gene is over-expressed. They demonstrated that the ABI4 at a central junction that determines the accumulation of signals from three different plant hormones. The balance and manipulation of these signals, achieved via ABI4, regulates root structure development.

According to the research conducted by BGU student Doron Shkolnik-Inbar and Prof. Dudy Bar-Zvi in BGU's Department of Life Sciences, "the revolutionary research will allow control and manipulation of the level of root branching, enabling plants to adapt to arid soils or high salinity."

Explore further: New alfalfa variety resists ravenous local pest

More information: ABI4 Mediates Abscisic Acid and Cytokinin Inhibition of Lateral Root Formation by Reducing Polar Auxin Transport in Arabidopsis[C], [W]
The Plant Cell 22:3560-3573 American Society of Plant Biologists.

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