Squid shown to be able to hear

Feb 08, 2011 by Lin Edwards report
Longfin inshore squid (Loligo pealeii). Image credit: NOAA.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists in the US have solved the mystery about whether squid can hear and if so, how.

Marine biologist T. Aran Mooney, a post-doctoral scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Massachusetts measured the to sounds in fitted with electrodes to detect from the statocysts, two sac-like sensory organs near the base of the brain in squid.

The longfin squid (Loligo pealeii) were in a tank and magnesium chloride was used to anesthetize them and keep them still, and underwater speakers (the kind used for synchronized swimmers) were used to play the sounds.

The results of the research confirm that squid can hear low-frequency sounds between 30 and 500 Hz, but there was no response if the water temperature was less than 8°C. Dr Mooney said the squid would probably be able to hear waves, the sounds of reefs, and wind above, but would not be able to hear high-frequency sounds such as echo-location signals emitted by toothed whales and dolphins, which are the main predators of the squid.

Unlike land animals, squid do not hear by detecting pressure changes produced by sound waves. Instead, they sense movements of the water that are produced by sound. Dr Mooney said the squid basically hears by detecting itself moving with the sound wave, and compared the process to a piece of fruit suspended in jelly. He said if you make the jelly wobble, the fruit moves as well as the jelly.

The statocysts are fluid-filled sacs lined with hair cells that project into the sac. A tiny calcium carbonate grain called a statolith is also present inside each statocyst. In response to motions produced by the hair cells touch the statolith and generate signals that are sent to the brain. The hair cells in the squid statocysts are analogous to the in the cochlear in human ears, which convert vibrations in the air to signals that are then sent to the brain.

The paper was published in The Journal of Experimental Biology. The researchers have now begun to investigate the squid’s relatively rudimentary to see if it can shed light on the evolution of hearing in higher animals. Dr Mooney is also hoping to study the effect of “the burgeoning cacophony of human-generated sounds in the ocean” to see if it affects squid behavior or threatens their survival.

Explore further: Rescued 'abandoned' penguin chicks survival similar to colony rates

More information: Sound detection by the longfin squid (Loligo pealeii) studied with auditory evoked potentials: sensitivity to low-frequency particle motion and not pressure, by T. Aran Mooney et al., Journal of Experimental Biology 213, 3748-3759 (2010). doi:10.1242/jeb.048348

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nuge
not rated yet Feb 08, 2011
Dr Mooney said the squid would probably be able to hear waves, the sounds of reefs, and wind above, but would not be able to hear high-frequency sounds such as echo-location signals emitted by toothed whales and dolphins, which are the main predators of the squid.


This raises more questions than it answers. Why can squid only hear useless background noise and not important survival information?
kevinrtrs
1.1 / 5 (22) Feb 08, 2011
A tiny calcium carbonate grain called a statolith is also present inside each statocyst.


Now this raises serious difficulties for any kind of evolutionary development. What are the probabilities of this happening by sheer random accident? Note that it has to be precisely the right size, weight and composition to trigger the proper responses in the hair cells. If not, it's goodbye "hearing" ability. Then following this - how did the creature get the information to create this structure from scratch, AND code it into its DNA for future use?

The common descend, chemicals-to-chemist evolution story makes as much sense as ten whales jumping out of the sea, getting onto land and singing and dancing on their tails to the tune of Beethoven's 5th symphony.
Rdavid
3.7 / 5 (3) Feb 08, 2011
One anesthetized, perhaps hearing-impaired or deaf squid, does not make a theory.
Mayor__Dooley
5 / 5 (12) Feb 08, 2011
Another act of drive-by asininity by the PhysOrg village idiot Kevin.
gwrede
3 / 5 (6) Feb 08, 2011
Dr Mooney said the squid would probably be able to hear waves, the sounds of reefs, and wind above, but would not be able to hear high-frequency sounds such as echo-location signals emitted by toothed whales and dolphins, which are the main predators of the squid.
This raises more questions than it answers. Why can squid only hear useless background noise and not important survival information?
A whale is so big and moves so fast compared to the squid, that they have no use of hearing it's coming. But hearing waves, the wind and the flow of water is beneficial in finding places to feed, reproduce, etc.
PaulieMac
5 / 5 (11) Feb 08, 2011
Now this raises serious difficulties for any kind of evolutionary development


lol. Every single time you post, kevinrtrs, it follows the same form: "This poses a HUGE PROBLEM for _insert_scientific_theory_here?"

And you know what. It never does pose a huge problem, nor indeed, any problem whatsoever. Evolution is supported by - literally - tons of evidence. The earth *is* billions of years old. There was no global flood.

You are free to believe what you wish, of course. You are free to continuously spout your nonsense here. But don't be deluded that you highlight a single interesting point; the only questions you raise are those that concern your own competence. Honestly - and I say this without malice - you simply look a fool.
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (9) Feb 08, 2011
A tiny calcium carbonate grain called a statolith is also present inside each statocyst.


Now this raises serious difficulties for any kind of evolutionary development. What are the probabilities of this happening by sheer random accident? Note that it has to be precisely the right size, weight and composition to trigger the proper responses in the hair cells. If not, it's goodbye "hearing" ability. Then following this - how did the creature get the information to create this structure from scratch, AND code it into its DNA for future use?

The common descend, chemicals-to-chemist evolution story makes as much sense as ten whales jumping out of the sea, getting onto land and singing and dancing on their tails to the tune of Beethoven's 5th symphony.

You are laughably stupid. Animals don't come up with an idea and then code it into their DNA to evolve. Go back to jr. high and take a science course.
Byagam_Gokulden
not rated yet Feb 08, 2011
A tiny calcium carbonate grain called a statolith is also present inside each statocyst.


Now this raises serious difficulties for any kind of evolutionary development. What are the probabilities of this happening by sheer random accident? Note that it has to be precisely the right size, weight and composition to trigger the proper responses in the hair cells. If not, it's goodbye "hearing" ability. Then following this - how did the creature get the information to create this structure from scratch, AND code it into its DNA for future use?

The common descend, chemicals-to-chemist evolution story makes as much sense as ten whales jumping out of the sea, getting onto land and singing and dancing on their tails to the tune of Beethoven's 5th symphony.


HAHAHAHA, OH WOW!

Someone, please tell me this guy is joking...
Skultch
1 / 5 (1) Feb 08, 2011
http://abstrusegoose.com/339
Skultch
1 / 5 (1) Feb 08, 2011
ID's best argument?

htDELETEMEtp://abstrusegoose.com/339
AdamCC
1 / 5 (1) Feb 08, 2011
test (sorry guys, testing a comment service).
Terrible_Bohr
5 / 5 (3) Feb 08, 2011
...What are the probabilities of this happening by sheer random accident? ...Then following this - how did the creature get the information to create this structure from scratch, AND code it into its DNA for future use? ...


I take it these are rhetorical. You can't really want these questions answered, as you never bothered to learn anything about evolution.
Tainted
1 / 5 (1) Feb 09, 2011
I've noticed a trend on this website. There are always so many negative comments. You have people like that Kevin guy, which make you wonder why he even reads a science news site as he obviously knows so little about science to retain or gain anything. Then you have some people (other articles) that bellow on about the article not having enough specifics, this and that. It's a news site, you want the specifics, go pay for a scientific journal, or enroll in college which gives you access to hundreds of databases filled with fulltext studies. I'm really disappointed in the comments I see here (albeit, a minority of all the comments)
Scipol
1 / 5 (5) Feb 09, 2011
I would blast the squid with sonar , like we do fetuses, you know, to torture it, and see if it can hear what the chef is cooking, atleast bombard it with frequency, you know to see if it squirms, and then we can control how it swims with frequency. then we can do this to fetuses.
soulman
5 / 5 (2) Feb 09, 2011
Now this raises serious difficulties for any kind of evolutionary development. What are the probabilities of this happening by sheer random accident? Note that it has to be precisely the right size, weight and composition to trigger the proper responses in the hair cells. If not, it's goodbye "hearing" ability. Then following this - how did the creature get the information to create this structure from scratch, AND code it into its DNA for future use?

You know, some people think that evolution is about continual improvement, leading to better and better designs, a striving for perfection. However, this claim is easily disproved. Exhibit A - the above post by Kev. If this is the current pinnacle of human intellect, then the species must surely be going backwards.