Spacewalking day for astronauts at space station

February 28, 2011 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
In this frame grab from video taken from NASA television, space shuttle Discovery is seen moments after docking at the International Space Station, its final visit before being parked at a museum, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011. (AP Photo/NASA)

(AP) -- A spacewalk is planned at the International Space Station.

Two of space shuttle Discovery's visiting crew will float outside late Monday morning. They will spend all afternoon moving a broken ammonia pump to a better location, installing an extension cable and doing other chores.

One of the going out is Stephen Bowen, who was assigned to the job just last month. The original lead spacewalker, Timothy Kopra, was injured in a bicycle accident and pulled off the flight. Kopra will help direct the from Mission Control. He's still on crutches.

This is the last flight for Discovery. After it returns to Earth next week, it will be retired and sent to the Smithsonian Institution. Only two other shuttle missions remain.

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