Sony to release a professional grade OLED screen

Feb 17, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Sony is set to begin selling a professional-grade monitor that will contain the largest number of commercial organic light-emitting diodes in a single screen produced to date. The monitor, which was designed for the TV and film production industries, is set to go on sale on May 1. They are expected to be used in locations such as editing bays, satellite trucks and broadcasting control rooms. The OLED screen will have a 25-inch screen. A second model, one that features a smaller 17-inch screen, is expected to go on sale on the first of July.

The OLED is a flat-panel screen technology made up of cells that contain an . The material used omits its own light. This allows the screens to be made thinner than the more well-known LCDs flat screens. The OLED screens are also more power efficient than LCD screens. OLED's are significantly more expensive to produce than LCD screens, which has hindered their wide-scale adoption, but they handle fast-moving images better. The colors also appear richer on the OLED screens when compared to images shown on the LCDs. Sony hosted a live demonstration of the new monitors at its Tokyo headquarters and played the same on OLED and LCD monitors side-by-side to illustrate this point.

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The new monitors will not be cheap. The 25-inch model is expected to cost $28,840. Despite how high that number seems when you compare it to the average home LCD monitor, it will only cost about 10 percent more than the LCD monitors that are currently in production for the film industry.

screens are already common in smaller gadgets, such as cell phones and other handheld devices.

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More information: Sony press release: pro.sony.com/bbsccms/assets/files/cat/mondisp/pressreleases/Sony_new_OLED_BVM-E_series-HPA_2011.pdf

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Eikka
not rated yet Feb 18, 2011
How suspectible is the OLED for image persistence or "burn in"?

It would seem that the limited lifetime of the LEDs at around 30,000 hours to 63% brightness would produce similiar effects as in plasma screens where you can't leave a static image on the screen or it will stay there forever.

So, not suitable for computer monitors.
wiyosaya
not rated yet Feb 18, 2011
How suspectible is the OLED for image persistence or "burn in"?

It would seem that the limited lifetime of the LEDs at around 30,000 hours to 63% brightness would produce similiar effects as in plasma screens where you can't leave a static image on the screen or it will stay there forever.

So, not suitable for computer monitors.

AFAIK, OLED is not susceptible to burn in. As well, OLED technology is rapidly improving. If you believe what the industry says, they should start appearing in large, consumer-grade displays in the next few years. A reasonable source of info is www"dot"oled-display"dot"net PIA not to be able to post urls.
Moebius
not rated yet Feb 18, 2011
Who says OLED isn't susceptible to burn-in? EVERYTHING is to one extent or another. Until we come up with a perfect light source or perfect materials that remain completely unchanged throughout their lifetime, burn-in can happen.

All light sources degrade over time with use. One way a burn-in image is formed is when some pixels are lit for a much greater part of their lifetime than others. If they are grouped in an image you have burn-in. The pixels in an OLED are emissive light sources, unlike an LCD screen where they are transmissive. Since they are light sources they can and will degrade over time and can have burn-in.

This isn't to say that there aren't work arounds to make it apparently without burn-in. They could be compensated for loss of brightness over time for one.

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