Scientists say it's high 'NOON' for microwave photons

Feb 15, 2011
Image of chip containing the superconducting integrated circuit used to generate NOON microwave states.

An important milestone toward the realization of a large-scale quantum computer, and further demonstration of a new level of the quantum control of light, were accomplished by a team of scientists at UC Santa Barbara and in China and Japan.

The study, published in the Feb. 7 issue of the journal , involved scientists from Zhejiang University, China, and NEC Corporation, Japan. The experimental effort was pursued in the research groups of UC Santa Barbara physics professors Andrew Cleland and John Martinis.

The team described how they used a superconducting quantum integrated circuit to generate unique quantum states of light known as "NOON" states. These states, generated from microwave frequency photons, the quantum unit of light, were created and stored in two physically-separated microwave storage cavities, explained first author Haohua Wang, postdoctoral fellow in physics at UC Santa Barbara. The quantum NOON states were created using one, two, or three photons, with all the photons in one cavity, leaving the other cavity empty. This was simultaneous with the first cavity being empty, with all the photons stored in the second cavity.

"This seemingly impossible situation, allowed by , led to interesting results when we looked inside the cavities," said second author Matteo Mariantoni, postdoctoral fellow in physics at UC Santa Barbara. "There was a 50 percent chance of seeing all the photons in one cavity, and a 50 percent chance of not finding any — in which case all the photons could always be found in the other cavity."

However, if one of the cavities was gently probed before looking inside, thus changing the quantum state, the effect of the probing could be seen, even if that cavity was subsequently found to be empty, he added.

"It's kind of like the states are ghostly twins or triplets," said Wang. "They are always together, but somehow you never know where they are. They also have a mysterious way of communicating, so they always seem to know what is going to happen." Indeed, these types of states display what Einstein famously termed, "spooky action at a distance," where prodding or measuring a in one location affects its behavior elsewhere.

The quantum integrated circuit, which includes superconducting quantum bits in addition to the microwave storage cavities, forms part of what eventually may become a quantum computational architecture.

Explore further: 'Cavity protection effect' helps to conserve quantum information

Provided by UC Santa Barbara

4.7 /5 (20 votes)

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kevinrtrs
1.4 / 5 (21) Feb 15, 2011
We live in an absolutely magical universe. It's just that all the magic appears to amenable to reason instead of being totally random and beyond our ken.

Just look at the words used by the researchers: "ghostly","spooky", "mysterious", "knowing what is going to happen". Does that all sound like some fairytale already? And yet it all is subject to reason.

So how about there being an intelligent creator behind it all - one who knows things before they happen, who is logical and reasonable beyond fault? One who knows what we are thinking and doing even when we have no idea where He is?

Does it all sound so far-fetched now? Just review the article again if you still think so.

Davery
3.8 / 5 (10) Feb 15, 2011
Sigh. Stop posting your mysticism here please. There are no such things as Gods. If things are "mysterious" it is only because they're 1) really complicated and 2) difficult to relate to our "mid scale" everyday life. Read Quantum mechanics at degree level, then some Dawkins and then get lost.
DontBeBlind
1.2 / 5 (17) Feb 15, 2011
I think one major thing holding us back from further huge breakthroughs is the fact that they fail to accept that everything was created by a God. If they would start working these problems from the point of view that they are all created and part of a system. Then taking that system apart and understanding it becomes more fruit full.
PaulieMac
4.7 / 5 (15) Feb 15, 2011
If there was such a being as you describe - it would be a monster.

I saw something on TV the other night. A baby, born with some mysterious disease. This baby spent her heartbreaking little life in the most miserable, abject pain. There was no grace to it, no redemption. Just a blameless, defenceless little creature suffering in such horrific fashion as to make one weep to hear tell.

And you know what? Look over history, start counting. That poor girl was one amongst billions. *Billions* of human and animal lives measured out in misery and in pain.

And you find it comforting to think that there is some unimaginably powerful and omniscient being out there that's done that on purpose?? That *approves*???

The very thought is sickening. 'Mysterious ways' my a*se. It would be, truly, a monster; one beyond all resistance or reason.

And you yearn for something like that to exist?
PaulieMac
5 / 5 (14) Feb 15, 2011
I think one major thing holding us back from further huge breakthroughs is the fact that they fail to accept that everything was created by a God


Well, in that case... What, exactly, is holding *you* back?
zz6549
5 / 5 (14) Feb 15, 2011
So your thought process is basically:

- I don't understand it
- Therefore, God exists

You're just too lazy to think. Why you even come to a site like this is beyond me.

mogmich
3 / 5 (2) Feb 15, 2011
It is quite true, that Quantum Mechanics is mysterious the way kevintrs says. But his conclusion: "So how about there being an intelligent creator behind it all" is probably wrong. There is no God existing outside the Universe, and influencing it from there.

But that is not the only possible "religious" interpretation. Another interpretation is: quantum states ARE mental states, rather than physical entities. This idea can be found in socalled "panpsycism", and fits quite well into Buddhist thinking.

Many atheists would probably not like this idea, but taken as an interpretation of Quantum Mechanics it is just as good as the "multiverse" theory, and other interpretations. Which interpretation is the correct one is not known by science today. Only the mathematical calculations in Quantum Mechanics are known to be correct.

rawdoc
5 / 5 (14) Feb 15, 2011
It is getting rather annoying to find so many Atheist/Believer debates in a science web site. Some of us are just interested in the actual science behind Quantum computers. Forums exist for debating Atheism vs. Belief; why co-opt Physorg for an essentially Religio/Philosophical debate. It's like listening to 2 school children rank each other at Lunchtime. And the level of debate over 'God' is rather trite on both sides. Please, let's just accept that both Atheists & Believers will have smaller more efficient computers with which to insult each other.
Mr_Man
5 / 5 (5) Feb 15, 2011
It is getting rather annoying to find so many Atheist/Believer debates in a science web site. Some of us are just interested in the actual science behind Quantum computers. Forums exist for debating Atheism vs. Belief; why co-opt Physorg for an essentially Religio/Philosophical debate. It's like listening to 2 school children rank each other at Lunchtime. And the level of debate over 'God' is rather trite on both sides. Please, let's just accept that both Atheists & Believers will have smaller more efficient computers with which to insult each other.


Well said, thank you. This site is NOT the place for discussions of "God vs. no God". I only hope the moderators of this site do a better job cleaning out such arguments. Offenders really should be banned, I've take months off from this site because I've gotten so fed up with the religious debates. If I wanted to hear about God I would call my bible thumping mother.
jscroft
1 / 5 (3) Feb 15, 2011
meh
El_Nose
2.8 / 5 (4) Feb 15, 2011
saying there is not such thing as a God is a really very blunt statement -- most esteemed scientists will state that they have not seen evidence of God - but very few will step out on the ledge and say God does not exits -- why? well there is no proof one way or another. It's easy to poke holes in statements made by pure creationists - but their are some very logical and esteemed scientists that do believe in God - but they don;t let that belief interfere with doing good science. the two can be mutually exclusive if you allow them to be.
Quantum_Conundrum
3.3 / 5 (3) Feb 15, 2011
So....basicly a quantum computer is useless.

Yes?
Yes!
No?
No!
Yes, no?
No, Yes!
bloodyanarch
1 / 5 (2) Feb 15, 2011
I think the real reason a scientist won't say God doesn't exist is because there isn't a standard definition of what god is. If you said god is someone with the ability to create life then every woman who's give birth fall under that definition. Typically god is described as "unknowable" and with that definition it becomes a non argument. I guess with that statement you could say that then everything we do know is not god...So Quantum Computing is not God YA!
kaypee
5 / 5 (4) Feb 15, 2011
Every time I see a post interjecting big "G" God into a scientific discussion, I get a mental image of an autistic OCD child who will never be able to have a "normal" conversation with the rest of humanity.
SmartK8
5 / 5 (5) Feb 15, 2011
I'm really starting to hate these religious/mystique hijackers. Give us a break. There are plenty websites more closer to your taste. Why on earth would you go on Physorg, read some article slightly challenging to your favorite dogma, and then go on, and try to explain everyone how they are wrong, and your right. It's almost every article nowadays. Ok, I get it. Evolution. Ok, I get it. The Big Bang. Ok, I get it. Moon landing is a fake. Ooo, controversy. But some "quantum semiconductors", really ?
physpuppy
not rated yet Feb 15, 2011
SmartK8 :

religious/mystique hijackers...Why on earth would you go on Physorg, read some article slightly challenging to your favorite dogma, and then go on, and try to explain everyone how they are wrong, and your right.


The reason must be:

(drum roll please)

The devil made them do it.

:-)
crowditout
not rated yet Feb 15, 2011
Back to the Science...is the weirdness of "spooky action a a distance" not just caused by the fact that photons move at the speed of light and therefore don't really have any sense of time? Or can particles with mass which don't travel at the speed of light (eg electrons) also become entangled in the same way?
Sanescience
5 / 5 (1) Feb 16, 2011
Assuming that the unmentioned state of entanglement is involved, I saw a written opinion a while ago that this kind of stuff represents "up stream effects". I believe the analogy was that if we experience time at a position along the "river of time" then if one is very clever, you can splash the water such that the ripples can travel "ahead" of you and interact before returning to your position where you see the result.

Mind bending stuff. Probably is going let us "be God" some day. Perhaps the effect can be reversed and our far decedents will be able to measure all the things in our history that ever *was* and let us "resurrect" anything from the past.

And wouldn't an atheist be surprised to wake up from "death" to discover it was his descendants that decided God helps those who help themselves, and built heaven themselves. Could happen, who says spirituality and science don't mix!

LOL!
zslewis91
not rated yet Feb 19, 2011
So....basicly a quantum computer is useless.

Yes?
Yes!
No?
No!
Yes, no?
No, Yes!


QC!!!!!!i love it:):):) very funny:):):)
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Feb 19, 2011
We live in an absolutely magical universe. It's just that all the magic appears to amenable to reason instead of being totally random and beyond our ken.

Just look at the words used by the researchers: "ghostly","spooky", "mysterious", "knowing what is going to happen". Does that all sound like some fairytale already? And yet it all is subject to reason.

So how about there being an intelligent creator behind it all - one who knows things before they happen, who is logical and reasonable beyond fault? One who knows what we are thinking and doing even when we have no idea where He is?

Does it all sound so far-fetched now? Just review the article again if you still think so.


Reality looks magical to those who don't live within it.