Non-surgical approach to treat hepatic hydatid cysts

Feb 07, 2011

A research team from Saudi Arabia determined the efficacy and success of percutaneous aspiration irrigation and re-aspiration (PAIR) in the management of hepatic hydatidosis. They found that PAIR using hypertonic saline is very effective and safe with proper precautions.

Concerning treatment, until recently the only definitive treatment for hydatid disease had been surgery. Different surgical techniques and procedures have been carried out and even in some cases, a has been required. Advances in drug therapy has been influenced by the introduction of albendazole and accelerated by addition of praziquantel, but this requires a long period of treatment i.e. up to a year or more, and is not effective for everyone.

A research article to be published on February 7, 2011 in the addresses this question. In this study, the authors assessed the value of percutaneous drainage with adjuvant medical therapy in 26 patients with confirmed 32 hepatic hydatid cysts (HHC) over an average follow-up period of 10 years.

All 32 cysts showed evidence of immediate collapse after completion of the procedure, and before discharge from hospital, showed fluid reaccumulation in all cysts. Serial follow-up showed a progressive decrease in the size and change in the appearance of cysts. To confirm the sterility of these cystic cavities, seven cysts were re-aspirated on average 3 mo after the procedure. Investigations revealed no viable scolices.

The study might provide some confirmation of the efficacy of a non-surgical approach to the treatment of liver hydatidosis.

Explore further: Arizona monitoring hundreds for measles linked to Disneyland

More information: Yasawy MI, Mohammed AE, Bassam S, Karawi MA, Shariq S. Percutaneous aspiration and drainage with adjuvant medical therapy for treatment of hepatic hydatid cysts. World J Gastroenterol 2011; 17(5): 646-650 www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v17/i5/646.htm

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A primer on aspirating breast lumps

Mar 01, 2010

A patient with a breast lump that has no features suggesting cancer should still be immediately evaluated, according to a primer for physicians in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

The pill for ovarian cysts

Mar 30, 2010

Ovarian endometriomas, better known as ovarian 'chocolate' cysts for the brown liquid they contain, can be easily removed by surgery. However, recurrence is common, which can cause ongoing pain and complications. A study ...

Laparoscopic approach to retrorectal cyst

Dec 01, 2008

Retrorectal cystic hamartoma (hindgut cyst) is a rare developmental lesion arising from the vestiges of the embryonic hind gut. Other developmental cysts can occur in retrorectal space. Anal gland cysts can develop near the ...

The embryogenesis evidence of foregut duplication cyst

Jan 25, 2011

A research team from United States reported two cases of gastric duplication cysts with a pseudostratified respiratory epithelium, with emphasis on their immunophenotype and embryogenesis. They explored the possible embryogenesis ...

Experiments point to new treatments for PKD

Apr 02, 2008

A family of small molecules called CFTR inhibitors show promising effects in slowing the progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), the most common genetic disease of the kidneys, according to preliminary research reported ...

Recommended for you

Kidney-brain connection may help drive chronic kidney disease

7 hours ago

In addition to affecting blood pressure, high-salt intake can promote kidney function decline in patients with chronic kidney disease. A study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (J ...

Flu's grip on U.S. starting to weaken: CDC

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—After a rough start to the flu season, the number of infections seems to have peaked and is even starting to decline in many parts of the nation, federal health officials reported Thursday.

Litchi fruit suspected in mystery illness in India

8 hours ago

A mysterious and sometimes fatal brain disease that has afflicted children in northeastern India for years could be linked to a toxic substance in litchi fruits, US researchers said Thursday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.