US issues cheaper boiler rules

Feb 23, 2011
Smoke stacks at a power plant in the US. The US administration overhauled rules Wednesday to cut air pollution from industrial boilers and incinerators but at almost half the price of initial plans criticized by industrial groups.

The US administration overhauled rules Wednesday to cut air pollution from industrial boilers and incinerators but at almost half the price of initial plans criticized by industrial groups.

US Assistant Administrator Gina McCarthy said the final regulations would provide benefits similar to the previous ones but at a reduced cost.

"The Clean Air Act standards we are issuing today are based on the best available science and have benefited from significant public input," said McCarthy, who heads the EPA's air and radiation office.

"As a result, they put in place important public health safeguards to cut harmful toxic air emissions that affect children's development, aggravate asthma and cause heart attacks at costs."

The initially proposed standard would have cost 20 billion dollars and the loss of 300,000 jobs, according to an industry-financed study. The EPA put its estimate at $3.5 billion.

In comparison, the EPA said the new version of the rule would cost $1.8 billion a year and create over 2,000 new jobs.

The latest move came after President vowed to review a broad range of regulations in the midst of a brutal and a court ruling that ordered the government to act by this week.

Although the agency met the judge's deadline, it said it would be open to comments and proposed changes from businesses, lawmakers and citizens.

Some industrial groups nonetheless said the rules were still too tough.

Aric Newhouse, senior vice president for policy and government relations at the National Association of Manufacturers, criticized what the called an example of the "EPA's aggressive, overreaching agenda."

"This is a harsh, inflexible rule that will cost jobs, hurt global competitiveness and may discourage projects that could otherwise lead to environmental improvements," Newhouse added in a statement.

Approximately 200,000 boilers, incinerators and small-scale will be affected by the new regulations. They are the source of most air-borne toxic emissions, such as mercury and toxins, in the United States.

Explore further: Dead floppy drive: Kenya recycles global e-waste

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

EPA requires cleanup of mercury from cement plants

Aug 10, 2010

The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday announced the nation's first limits on mercury emissions from cement plants. The decision also will require reductions of other harmful pollutants from cement plants, including ...

EPA: Clean-air rule would overturn Bush-era plan

Jul 06, 2010

(AP) -- The Obama administration is proposing new rules to tighten restrictions on pollution from coal-burning power plants in the eastern half of the country, a key step to cut emissions that cause smog.

EPA acts on clean air interstate rule

Mar 16, 2006

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it's taken several actions to assure "timely and efficient implementation" of the Clean Air Interstate Rule.

States call on EPA for tougher air pollution regulations

Nov 06, 2009

Twelve states and the District of Columbia urged the Environmental Protection Agency Thursday to adopt more rigorous national policies so they can meet federal air pollution reduction requirements for the region.

EPA to limit mercury emissions from power plants

Oct 26, 2009

The Environmental Protection Agency will put controls on the emissions of hazardous pollutants such as mercury from coal-fired power plants for the first time by November 2011, according to an agreement announced Friday to ...

Recommended for you

Dead floppy drive: Kenya recycles global e-waste

40 minutes ago

In an industrial area outside Kenya's capital city, workers in hard hats and white masks take shiny new power drills to computer parts. This assembly line is not assembling, though. It is dismantling some ...

New paper calls for more carbon capture and storage research

5 hours ago

Federal efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions must involve increased investment in research and development of carbon capture and storage technologies, according to a new paper published by the University of Wyoming's ...

Coal gas boom in China holds climate change risks

10 hours ago

Deep in the hilly grasslands of remote Inner Mongolia, twin smoke stacks rise more than 200 feet into the sky, their steam and sulfur billowing over herds of sheep and cattle. Both day and night, the rumble ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Doom1974
5 / 5 (3) Feb 23, 2011
And what are the new rules exactly?? Info please.
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (6) Feb 23, 2011
"We are from the government and we are here to help."
Trust but verify.
Where is the data?
Howhot
1 / 5 (1) Feb 24, 2011
"We are from the Republicon and we will cut your taxes". Quick, hide your wallet.