Researchers map out ice sheets shrinking during Ice Age

Feb 11, 2011
These maps show the rate at which the ice sheet over the British Isles during the last Ice Age melted. The ka on the images is short for thousand years and BP is ‘before present.’ So 27 Ka BP is the map of the ice sheet at 27,000 years ago. Credit: University of Sheffield

A set of maps created by the University of Sheffield have illustrated, for the first time, how our last British ice sheet shrunk during the Ice Age.

Led by Professor Chris Clark from the University's Department of Geography, a team of experts developed the maps to understand what effect the current shrinking of ice sheets in parts of the Antarctic and Greenland will have on the speed of .

The unique maps record the pattern and speed of shrinkage of the large ice sheet that covered the British Isles during the last Ice Age, approximately 20,000 years ago. The sheet, which subsumed most of Britain, Ireland and the , had an ice volume sufficient to raise by around 2.5 metres when it melted.

Using the maps, researchers will be able to understand the mechanisms and rate of change of ice sheet retreat, allowing them to make predictions for our , whose ice sheets appear to be melting as a result of temperature increases in the air and oceans.

The maps are based on new information on glacial landforms, such as moraines and drumlins, which were discovered using new technology such as remote sensing data that is able to image the land surface and at unprecedented resolutions. Experts combined this new information with that from fieldwork, some of it dating back to the nineteenth century, to produce the final maps of retreat.

These maps show the rate at which the ice sheet over the British Isles during the last Ice Age melted. The ka on the images is short for thousand years and BP is ‘before present.’ So 27 Ka BP is the map of the ice sheet at 27,000 years ago. Credit: University of Sheffield

It is also possible to use the maps to reveal exactly when land became exposed from beneath the ice and was available for colonisation and use by plants, animals and humans. This provides the opportunity for viewers to pinpoint when their town/region emerged.

Professor Chris Clark, from the University of Sheffield's Department of Geography, said: "It took us over 10 years to gather all the information in order to produce these maps, and we are delighted with the results, It is great to be able to visualise the ice sheet and notice that retreat speeds up and slows down, and it is vital of course that we learn exactly why. With such understanding we will be able to better predict ice losses in Greenland and Antarctica.

"In our next phase of work we hope to really tighten up on the timing and rates of retreat in more detail, by dropping tethered corers from a ship to extract seafloor sediments that can be radiocarbon dated."

These findings were published in Quaternary Science Reviews.

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User comments : 7

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gvgoebel
not rated yet Feb 11, 2011
BEGIN OBLIGATORY AGW DISPUTE:
Nik_2213
not rated yet Feb 11, 2011
Thanks for the multiple high-res maps !! I've been looking for something like this as background to a story.
po6ert
not rated yet Feb 11, 2011
here's to global warming!
Egleton
not rated yet Feb 11, 2011
@gvgoebel.
This site is infested with disinformation professionals.
It is their job to clog up the flow of information.
There are powerful forces at play here.
I accuse the coal industry.
gvgoebel
5 / 5 (1) Feb 11, 2011
"Never attribute to malice what can be just as well attributed to stupidity."
jmcanoy1860
not rated yet Feb 12, 2011
I like cheese
GSwift7
not rated yet Feb 14, 2011
The assumption that melt patterns of ice age ice sheets will be similar to modern melting is a bit presumptuous. We already know that ice sheets in different places of today's world expand and contract in different ways from region to region and even in different ways at the same place but at different altitudes and on land versus at sea. The really big question, as they stated, is still the one about why the ice ages started and stopped in the first place. If this leads to an answer then that's really cool. Never know what will turn up when you look in a new place.

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