10% more GM crops in the world in 2010: study

February 22, 2011
Activists rip out GM crops in a field in Menville in 2004. The amount of the world's farmland given over to genetically modified (GM) crops grew 10% last year, with the United States remaining the biggest zone for the altered produce, according to a study released in Brazil Tuesday.

The amount of the world's farmland given over to genetically modified (GM) crops grew 10% last year, with the United States remaining the biggest zone for the altered produce, according to a study released in Brazil Tuesday.

A total of 148 million hectares (366 million acres) are now given over to GM plantations in 29 countries, handled by 15 million , according to the report by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA).

The United States accounts for nearly half that area, 67 million hectares, growing modified soya, maiz, cotton, rapeseed, squash, papaya, alfafa and beetroot.

Brazil was the second-biggest GM producer with 25 million hectares, much of it growing soya, maiz and cotton.

Anderson Galvao, representing the ISAAA in Brazil, said the Latin American nation was taking on so rapidly that it has doubled grain production in the past two decades.

Defenders of GM crops stress that they are more resistant to disease and insects, and are more productive.

Detractors fear the new varieties will supplant non-GM vegetation, with unknown long-term consequences for the and environment.

Explore further: Some GM crops legal in the U.K.

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2.3 / 5 (3) Feb 22, 2011
A glaring example of the completely in-your-face undue influence of BIG AG, lead by Monsanto, of course having their way with the FDA and USDA, even in the face of well-documented instances of trans-species gene transfer, and the almost limitless possibilities for those much-feared "unintended consequences".

Should be pretty clear from this who -at least those two- agencies actually work for, because I certainly don't see my best interests being considered here, even after making my understanding and opimion of the matter explicitly known before, during and after the public comment period.
3.7 / 5 (3) Feb 22, 2011
Transgenic engineering is dangerous and monopolistic. Patent law must be changed. The Plant Variety Protection Act is threatened. The Endangered Species Act is threatened as well as Anti Trust Acts. You cannot patent monopolistic transgenic code that infects other peoples property, that is code trespass which is equivalent to computer hacker virus code trespass.
3 / 5 (2) Feb 23, 2011
This will turn your hair white:
not rated yet Feb 23, 2011
Thx, sstritt,

That's one more to put in the balance against GMO food.
As if there weren't enough already.

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