FDA approves Lap-Band for millions more patients

Feb 16, 2011

(AP) -- Cosmetic drug and device maker Allergan Inc. says it has received approval to market its stomach-shrinking Lap-Band to millions more patients who are less obese than those currently using the device.

The expanded approval to patients with a between 30 and 40 and one weight-related medical condition, such as . Patients must also have previously attempted other weight loss strategies, like diet and exercise.

Allergan said roughly 37 million American patients meet the new criterion for the device. The adjustable band has been available in the U.S. since 2001.

A ring is placed over the top of the stomach and inflated with saline to tighten it and restrict how much food can enter and pass through the stomach.

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neiorah
not rated yet Feb 18, 2011
Why do they have to have diabetes first. Use it as a preventative measure since weight caused diabetes is caused by too much sugar and a resistance to insulin. Not good to wait until after the damage is done.

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