Study finds that electronic fetal heart rate monitoring greatly reduces infant mortality

Feb 12, 2011

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will present findings that prove that the use of fetal heart rate monitors lowers the rate of infant mortality.

There have been a handful of small studies conducted in the past that looked at the effectiveness of fetal monitors, but none of them were large enough to be conclusive.

"There was some criticism within the obstetric community that fetal heart rate monitoring was quickly accepted technology without proof that it was effective," said Suneet P. Chauhan, M.D., one of the study's authors. "We thought we could use data from the National Birth Cohort to get a large enough sample to gauge its effectiveness."

Chauhan and his colleagues (Han-Yang Chen, Cande Ananth, Anthony Vintzileos and Alfred Abuhamad) used a sample of 1,945,789 singleton infant birth and death records from the 2004 National Birth Cohort. Multivariable log-binomial regression models were fitted to estimate risk ratio to evaluate the association between electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (EFM) and mortality, while adjusting for age, race, marital status, education, smoking, and the infant's gender.

The results showed that in 2004, 89% of singleton pregnancies had EFM. EFM was associated with significantly lower (adjusted RR 0.75; 95% CI 0.69, 0.81); this was mainly driven by the lower risk of early neonatal mortality (adjusted RR 0.50; 95% CI 0.44, 0.57) associated with EFM. In low-risk pregnancies, EFM was associated with decreased risk for low (< 4) 5 min apgar scores (rr 0.54; 95% ci 0.49, 0.51), whereas in high risk pregnancies efm was also associated with decreased risk of neonatal seizures (adjusted rr 0.65; 95% ci 0.46, 0.94).

The study demonstrates that the use of EFM decreased early neonatal by 53%.

Explore further: Using feminist theory to understand male rape

Provided by Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study finds higher risk of stillbirth in women with fibroids

Feb 06, 2010

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Chicago, researchers will unveil findings that show that there is an increased risk of intrauterine ...

Recommended for you

Using feminist theory to understand male rape

3 hours ago

Decades of feminist research have framed rape and sexual assault as a 'women's issue', leaving little room for the experiences of male victims. But a new study published in the Journal of Gender Studies suggests that feminist ...

Simulation-based training improves endoscopy execution

Oct 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—Simulation-based training (SBT) improves clinicians' performance of gastrointestinal endoscopy in both test settings and clinical practice, according to research published in the October issue ...

Data sharing in pharmaceutical industry shows progress

Oct 16, 2014

To enhance the transparency of clinical trials for new drugs, a number of pharmaceutical firms have begun sharing data with investigators outside their own companies. Brian L. Strom, chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health ...

Swiss drug maker Roche posts flat 3Q sales

Oct 16, 2014

(AP)—Swiss drugmaker Roche Holding AG has reported "stable" or flat sales for the first nine months of 2013 but says the results show strong demand for its cancer drugs and emerging new products.

User comments : 0