Ego Compact Semi Submarine allows for underwater exploration for the lay person

Feb 24, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Fans of the adventures of Captain Nemo and the ship Nautilus will be pleased to know that soon you could be able to have your own undersea adventures, without the hassle of commandeering a vessel from the local base of the US Navy and dealing with those pesky treason charges after the trip. Thanks to a new vessel, named the Ego Compact Semi Submarine, you can be trolling the seas with very minimal training time under your belt.

The vehicle is technically called a semi-submarine because all of the craft does not go under the sea. The design is more like a pontoon style of boat with a transparent waterproof compartment that hangs from the middle of the boat. It lets you see below without having to go entirely below the water.

Admittedly, it does mean that you cannot use this single person craft for deep sea exploration, but you can still do a heck of a lot of exploration with it, without having to worry about the sea pressure levels that commonly create a need for stronger and bigger vessels. Think of this more like craft based snorkeling than it is diving.

The creators, a South Korean company Raonhaje, do plan to release the vehicle for use in organizations like tropical resorts as well as for sale for individual owners. The ships do not have a stated cost as of yet, so you will have to contact the company if you want to get more information on actually buying one of the crafts.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

Cruising speed has not been released at this time, but the company did say that the device can run eight hours at cruising speed or four hours at its top speed.

Explore further: College students use 'smart' technology in football helmets to detect injuries

More information: www.raonhaje.com/main.php?bo_table=ego1

Related Stories

World's smallest autonomous submarine

Jul 29, 2004

A new era of oceanic discovery, with potential applications ranging from shipwreck recovery, to mineral exploration, to search and rescue missions may be possible with the development of the world’s smallest ...

Go Under Water by Submarine Bicycle

Jul 30, 2004

A water-proof multipurpose submarine apparatus with bicycle-like principle of moving is created by specialists from the St. Petersburg State Marine Technical University. It is sized for two people that can operate it without pr ...

Expedition heads for world's deepest undersea volcanoes

Mar 25, 2010

A British scientific expedition is heading into the world's deepest volcanic rift, more than three miles beneath the waves in the Caribbean, to hunt for the deepest "black smoker" vents detected so far on ...

Recommended for you

Building a machine that sorts candy colors with iPhone

Dec 23, 2014

The very idea of a machine being able to color-sort M&Ms teases an inventor's imagination and interest in machines, electronics and programming. A person with a website called "reviewmylife" had heard about ...

Laser technology aids CO2 storage capabilities

Dec 23, 2014

DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory is attracting private industry attention and winning innovation awards for harnessing the power of lasers to monitor the safe and permanent underground storage ...

FAA, industry launch drone safety campaign

Dec 22, 2014

Alarmed by increasing encounters between small drones and manned aircraft, drone industry officials said Monday they are teaming up with the government and model aircraft hobbyists to launch a safety campaign.

User comments : 6

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

GSwift7
not rated yet Feb 24, 2011
I wonder how you would (un)trailer this thing? I don't imagine a regular boat lanch woud suffice, otherwise this might be really cool for weekend family recreation and fishing on a lake.
fixer
not rated yet Feb 24, 2011
Interesting variation on a glass bottomed boat.
resinoth
not rated yet Feb 24, 2011
great idea, should have thought of this
brianlmerritt
not rated yet Feb 25, 2011
Great concept - but a bit unfortunate for our remaining coral reefs.

Having seen so many people stand on coral (yes, even recently), I think some form of built in GPS "avoid this area" system is required...
Beard
not rated yet Feb 26, 2011
Unless they're in extremely shallow water, the coral would be safely beneath them.
resinoth
not rated yet Feb 27, 2011
this might prevent coral degredation - human interest in wellbeing typically = preservation. plus, the only damage would be fuel contamination (possible), or actually bumping the thing into a reef.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.