Court bars streaming of TV programming online

Feb 22, 2011 By JOELLE TESSLER , AP Technology Writer

(AP) -- In a key victory for television broadcasters, a federal court has ordered a Seattle start-up called ivi Inc. to stop distributing broadcast signals over the Internet without their consent.

The U.S. District Court in New York issued a preliminary injunction against ivi on Tuesday barring the company from streaming copyright-protected broadcast programming online.

Ivi captures over-the-air broadcast signals from stations in Seattle, New York, Chicago and Los Angeles and delivers them to subscribers who have downloaded its ivi TV player, which costs $4.99 a month.

The company is being sued for copyright infringement by the big broadcast networks, local stations in New York and Seattle, public broadcasters, several large movie studios and Major League Baseball.

Ivi said it will shut down its broadcast channel offerings while it appeals the court ruling.

"The oppressive big media networks must open their doors to innovators or they will inevitably fall," the company said in a statement. "People want responsible choice, not the one-size-fits-all television offerings imposed by powerful media interests."

In court, ivi has argued that it is entitled to the same rights to distribute broadcast programming that federal copyright law automatically grants cable TV operators.

Tuesday's court ruling rejected that reasoning, concluding that ivi does not qualify as a cable system.

The National Association of Broadcasters said it welcomed the decision.

Explore further: Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Key Automobile Alliance Chooses MeeGo For Cars

Jul 23, 2010

The Linux Foundation today announced that GENIVI, an auto-alliance driving the adoption of In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI), will adopt MeeGo as the standard software environment for IVI systems built by car companies including ...

Supreme Court rejects appeal of 'must-carry' rule

May 17, 2010

(AP) -- The Supreme Court has declined to take up a challenge from cable television operators to the 18-year-old requirement that they carry local broadcast stations on their systems.

Time Warner Cable customers may lose TV networks

Dec 28, 2010

(AP) -- Time Warner Cable Inc. customers from Portland, Maine, to Pensacola, Fla., could lose access to one of their network TV stations because of a contract dispute with Sinclair Broadcast Group.

Time Warner Cable says Big 4 shows to stay on-air

Dec 31, 2010

(AP) -- Time Warner Cable Inc. said Thursday that its customers will still be able to view major programming from ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox even if it can't reach a deal with broadcaster Sinclair before their contract expires ...

Public TV goes digital

Jun 16, 2006

Subscribers of Verizon's fiber-optic FiOS TV service will now have an option of high-definition public television.

Hearst, DirecTV reach deal on programming fees

Dec 31, 2010

(AP) -- DirecTV satellite subscribers around the country will continue to receive network TV stations owned by Hearst Corp. after the two companies reached a new deal over the fees that DirecTV pays the broadcasting company ...

Recommended for you

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

11 hours ago

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Hundreds in Mexico protest telecommunications law

12 hours ago

Hundreds of students and activists marched in Mexico's capital Tuesday to protest a telecommunications law being debated by the Senate that they say will allow the government to arbitrarily censor Internet content.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Amazon Prime wins streaming deal with HBO

Amazon scored a deal Wednesday to distribute old shows from premium cable TV channel HBO to its monthly Prime subscribers, landing a blow on rival Netflix in the streaming video battle.

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

"I think one can argue that if we were to follow a strong nuclear energy pathway—as well as doing everything else that we can—then we can solve the climate problem without doing geoengineering." So says Tom Wigley, one ...