US tweaks China over web-erasing diplomat's name

Feb 26, 2011
In this Jan. 19, 2011 file photo, outgoing U.S. Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman is seen at the White House in Washington. The U.S. is tweaking China for its online blocking of the American ambassador's name. Searches Huntsman's name in Chinese on a popular microblogging site called Sina Weibo were met with a message Friday that said results were unavailable due to unspecified "laws, regulations and policies." (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

(AP) -- The U.S. is tweaking China for its online blocking of the American ambassador's name.

Searches for Ambassador Jon Huntsman's name in Chinese on a popular microblogging site called Sina Weibo were met with a message Friday that said results were unavailable due to unspecified "laws, regulations and policies."

Huntsman, a Republican, is leaving his post and is seen as a potential White House contender in 2012.

State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said in a Twitter posting Saturday that "it is remarkable" that even before Huntsman leaves Beijing, "China has made him disappear from the Internet."

China apparently widened its Internet policing after online calls for protests like those that have swept the Middle East.

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frajo
1 / 5 (1) Feb 26, 2011
How cannot see how such a measure would be helpful for any component of the Chinese society. Thus, the question is, as always: cui bono?
Of course, a Republican running for president would not profit from being perceived as friend of "the Chinese".
geokstr
1 / 5 (2) Feb 27, 2011
Yes, that must be it, frajo, the Chinese capitalist roaders are in league with the Republicans.

More like a perfect example of what happens to you when you are no longer of use to a socialist workers' utopia - you get erased from history. In modern technological times, they can sometimes do that without actually killing you, but if it comes to that, oh, well, adios muchachos...(shrug)
frajo
not rated yet Feb 27, 2011
More like a perfect example of what happens to you when you are no longer of use to a socialist workers' utopia - you get erased from history.
I don't know whether you realize it - but this is quite flattering; thanks.
In modern technological times, they can sometimes do that without actually killing you, but if it comes to that, oh, well, adios muchachos...(shrug)
I've to admit I don't dislike your emotions.
geokstr
1 / 5 (2) Feb 27, 2011
Well, thanks for being honest. It's very rare for a leftling to say what they really mean, because they know most people would find it appalling.

You consider revising history to fit your ideological narrative to be "flattering"? Wow, just...wow. The Zinnized "history" books that infect our schools these days must be just the cat's pajamas for you.

You must be anxiously anticipating the coming of Big Brother, and the "15 minutes of hate".
Michael_Schlabig
3 / 5 (2) Feb 28, 2011
why in the world are the people who want to shut down wikileaks and who want to allow internet companies to control the content of the web in the US AND who want the president to be able to legally shut our internet off at a whim now worried about China's long abuse of free information?????

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